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Watermelon sangria seeds

Sangria Hybrid Watermelon Seed

Plants will be shipped at the proper planting time for your area of the country using the shipping timeframes outlined below. We continually monitor weather conditions for extreme hot or cold and adjust shipping schedules as needed. Due to hot weather conditions, we are unable to ship most plant items in July and August.

Fall 2021 Shipping Schedule
ZONE SEEDS
1A to 4A 6/1/21 – 10/29/21
4B 6/1/21 – 10/29/21
5A 6/1/21 – 10/29/21
5B 6/1/21 – 10/29/21
6A 6/1/21 – 10/29/21
6B 6/1/21 – 10/29/21
7A 6/1/21 – 10/29/21
7B 6/1/21 – 10/29/21
8A & B 6/1/21 – 10/29/21
9A & B 6/1/21 – 10/29/21
10A & B 6/1/21 – 10/29/21
Last Order Date All Grow Zones:Oct 25, 2021

The type of product you order or the weather in our area to yours may affect the anticipated shipping schedule, shifting earlier or later, depending.

Trees and shrubs are kept in the nursery row until full dormant for optimum stress protection.

In all cases, we choose the fastest, most efficient way to send your orders via the U.S. Postal Service or FedEx. Large orders or large items may be shipped to you in multiple packages.

Sorry, we cannot ship products to Hawaii, Alaska, APO/FPO or outside the contiguous United States. Please provide a street address as some products are unable to be delivered to Post Office boxes.

SANGRIA

87 days. One of summer’s most popular treats grown in your own backyard! Voluptuous, oval fruit reach 20–23 pounds with jade green stripes on a forest green background. The deep red flesh is high in sugars and even higher in flavor and eating quality. Plants consistently produce mouth-watering fruit with the most refreshing, delectable taste. IR: A, F 1

Key Features:

Key Features:

Customer Reviews

Soil Temp for Germ 70–85°F
Seed Depth ½”
Days to Emergence 3–10
Soil Temp for Transp 60°F
Plant Spacing 3–4′
Row Spacing 5–6′
Fertilizer Needs High
Minimum Germination 80%
Seeds per Gram ≈ 20–40
Seed Life 3 years

Melons: Cucumis melo
Watermelons: Citrullus lanatus

The sweet succulence of summer-ripe melons is irresistibly tempting, but the health benefits of these luscious fruits shouldn’t be overlooked. Look to red-fleshed melons to fortify the heart and urinary tract. Yellow and orange flesh types provide support to the immune system, heart and vision. Green-fleshed varieties promote strong bones and teeth as well as vision health. We’ve selected varieties that are successful in both southern and northern gardens.

Days to maturity are calculated from transplant date.

Culture
• Melons and watermelons perform best in fertile, well-drained soil with a pH of 6.0-7.0
• Apply 1/2 cup of TSC’s Complete fertilizer and a shovelful of compost to each plant
• Watermelons are less tolerant of cool conditions than melons — the use of plastic mulch or floating row cover is highly recommended
• Monitor the temperature under the row covers on hot days, especially early in the season
• Remove covers prior to flowering for pollination

Direct Sowing
• Soil temperature is critical for good germination and only recommended in warmer climates

Transplanting
• Start indoors in 4 inch pots, 3-4 weeks before anticipated transplant date
• Grow the seedlings under dry, warm conditions
• Avoid letting starts get root bound; transplant carefully as to not disturb roots
• Fertilize seedlings with a balanced liquid fertilizer, such as Age Old Grow

Insects & Diseases
• Common insects: Cucumber beetles
• Insect control: Pyrethrin and row covers
• Common diseases: Bacterial wilt and powdery mildew
• Disease control: Zonix
• Disease prevention: 3-4 year crop rotation, avoid overhead watering

Harvest & Storage
• Cantaloupe will easily slip from vine when ripe
• With other melons, check the leaf where fruit is attached to the vine — fruit is mature when this leaf begins to yellow
• Watermelons are ready for harvest when the tendril closest to the fruit is dry and brown or when the bottom side of the fruit is yellow
• Melons and watermelons will not ripen off vine
• Pick in the cool of the day and chill quickly
• Melons: store at 40°F and 95% relative humidity
• Watermelons: store at 50-60°F and 85% relative humidity

KEY TO MELON DISEASE RESISTANCE AND TOLERANCE
A | Anthracnose
AB | Early (Alternaria) Blight
F* | Fusarium Wilt

MNSV | Melon Necrotic Spot Virus
PM* | Powdery Mildew
PRV | Papaya Ringspot Virus
WMV | Watermelon Mosaic Virus
ZYMV | Zucchini Yellow Mosaic Virus
*Numbers indicate specific disease race.

Sangria, (F1) Watermelon Seeds

The Sangria Watermelon has an excellent consistency and a deep red flesh that is high in sugar content and even higher in flavor and eating quality! This mouth-watering variety is an F1 hybrid that will consistently produce high yields of excellent quality fruits. This watermelon will grow to be 20-23 pounds with jade green stripes on a forest green background.

Product Details

0.018

0.2

4.5

3.25

Citrullus lanatus var. lanatus

Seed

14

Seeds Per Pound

6400

8′

10 seeds

1/2″

Fusarium Wilt,Anthracnose

Seeds Per Ounce

400

Red

F1 Hybrid

Full

DIPOLID WATERMELONS

20-25 lbs.

Annual

Direct Sow

18-36″

Watermelon

3,4,5,6,7,8,9

3,4,5,6,7,8,9,10

Days To Maturity (# Days)

87

Components

Growing Instructions

The sprawling plant is fun to grow for families. Planting watermelons from seeds allows gardeners to handpick which sort of fruit they want, as watermelon comes in seedless, different colors, large and small varieties. Seedless is one of the more common plants, and although the fruit is not completely seed free, the seeds are small, transparent and edible.

Before Planting: A light, well-drained soil with a pH of 6.5–7.5 and a southern exposure is ideal. Sow seeds outdoors after last frost is expect and soil temperatures are above 70°F. Triploid (Seedless) watermelon varieties need to be grown with Diploid (Seed) watermelon varieties for fertilization. Sugar Baby is good selection for a diploid fertilizer.

Planting: For direct seeding, sow 1–2 weeks after last frost when soil is warm, above 70°F, 3 seeds every 18–36″, 1″ deep. Thin to 1 plant per location when seedlings have first true leaves. If transplanting, sow 2-3 seeds, 1″ deep in a 2″ peat pot 2-4 weeks before last frost date (no sooner!). Germinate at 80°F then reduce to a constant 75°F). Keep well watered until 1 week before placing outdoors. Reduce water and temperature for a week to harden seedlings. Transplant 2–3′ apart in rows 6–8′ apart. Even hardened watermelon seedlings are tender! Do not disturb roots when transplanting, and water thoroughly.

Watering: When they are younger, watermelon plants require lots up water, up to 2 inches per week. If your able try not to water the fruits 1 week before harvest as over-watering can cause bland fruit.

Fertilizer: Prior to planting, amend soil with compost and a higher nitrogen fertilizer. Once vines begin to ramble, side dress plants with a 5-10-5 fertilizer and again once the melons are set.

Days to Maturity: There are 2 good ways to tell when a watermelon is ripe: 1) the tendril nearest the point on the vine where fruit stem attaches is browning/dead. 2) the spot where the fruit rests on the ground is pale yellow. (See each variety for days to maturity)

Harvesting: Once a watermelon is picked, it doesn’t ripen any further. To harvest, take a knife and cut
the watermelon from the plant, cutting the stem close to the fruit. Hold at 40-50°F and 85% relative humidity for 2–3 weeks. It is suggested to chill the watermelon prior to serving.

Tips: Pruning the plant is not necessary, but it may direct more energy to growing the fruits. If you choose to prune,
remove the small vines that grow laterally. To prevent rotting, gently lift the fruit as it gets bigger and turn it.

AVG. Direct Seeding Rate: 1 oz./340′, 1,000 seeds/500′, 3 oz./1,000′, 1⅓ lb./acre at 3 seeds every 18″, in rows 6′ apart.

Shipping Schedule

Our Seed Promise

“Agriculture and seeds” provide the basis upon which our lives depend. We must protect this foundation as a safe and genetically stable source for future generations. For the benefit of all farmers, gardeners and consumers who want an alternative, we pledge that we do not knowingly buy or sell genetically engineered seeds or plants.

The mechanical transfer of genetic material outside of natural reproductive methods and between genera, families or kingdoms, poses great biological risks as well as economic, political, and cultural threats. We feel that genetically engineered varieties have been insufficiently tested prior to public release. More research and testing is necessary to further assess the potential risks of genetically engineered seeds. Further, we wish to support agricultural progress that leads to healthier soils, to genetically diverse agricultural ecosystems, and ultimately to healthy people and communities.