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Pan jam seeds

Pan Jam

Pan Jam by Mass Medical Strains is a unique blend of heirloom genetics with a little something extra. Created by crossing Panama Powerhouse (Panama Red x G13 Black Widow F6) by Dman Seeds and the famous Jamaican heirloom strain, Lamb’s Bread, this genetic mashup pays homage to some of the oldest and most enjoyed cuts in the cannabis cannon. Its heady buzz has been described as semi-psychedelic, while its body effects have been utilized for pain relief, making Pan Jam a wild, if not affective ride.

Pan Jam by Mass Medical Strains is a unique blend of heirloom genetics with a little something extra. Created by crossing Panama Powerhouse (Panama Red x G13 Black Widow F6) by Dman Seeds and the famous Jamaican heirloom strain, Lamb’s Bread, this genetic mashup pays homage to some of the oldest and most enjoyed cuts in the cannabis cannon. Its heady buzz has been described as semi-psychedelic, while its body effects have been utilized for pain relief, making Pan Jam a wild, if not affective ride.

Jam Made with Frozen Berries

The freezer is underrated as the most unfussy method of preservation. With this fabulous invention, we can make fresh berry jam long after the berries are gone from the farmers’ markets. In the heat of summer, it’s hard sometimes to want to stand at the stove and stir for so long, but in these colder times of the year, it’s downright luxurious to do so. Picked at the peak of ripeness and then frozen, these berries will be exponentially better than a pale, washed-out berry from faraway climes at this time of year. Get them into the jam pot before they thaw; the faster they defrost, the less juice escapes the fruits. This makes a thicker, tastier jam.

If you are not familiar with the water bath canning method watch our water bath canning video workshop. Always make sure you are following all safety guidelines outlined by the USDA when canning anything.

makes 6 half-pint jars

Directions

Prepare a water bath canner and sterilize 6 half-pint jars.
Remove the berries from the freezer.
Place the frozen berries in a jam pan or other flaring, heavy-bottomed pot and set it over low heat.
As the berries defrost, they will begin to weep, creating liquid in the bottom of the pan. Stir continuously until the juices are released from the berries.The heat can be increased as the juices pool in the pan.

Bring the berries to a boil over high heat.
Add the sugar, and stir to combine.
Using a potato masher, crush and mash the berries, if desired, for a smoother, more uniform texture. This may not be as necessary if using all soft fruits like raspberries, but if whole strawberries are used, it makes for a better, more spreadable texture.
Add the lemon juice and stir to combine.
Continue to cook until the mixture thickens and the bubbles in the pan erupt slowly, like lava rather than boiling berry tea.

At this stage, the jam should pass the gel test. See how it slides off the spoon in a sheet, rather than individual droplets? That’s a perfect indicator of a jam that has gelled properly.

Ladle the jam into warm, clean jars, leaving 1/4” headspace.

Wipe the rims, secure the lids, and process in a boiling water bath canner for 15 minutes.

Place the processed jars on a kitchen towel and let cool. If all of your jars have sealed they can be stored in a cool, dark place for up to one year . Jars that have not sealed should go into the refrigerator or be enjoyed immediately.

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Over to You

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If you are not familiar with the water bath canning method watch our water bath canning video workshop. Always make sure you are following all safety guidelines outlined by the USDA when canning anything. Keeping a great journal leads to delicious results! Get inspired by new recipes, expert articles and homemade food adventures in our Monthly Journal.