Posted on

Mossm cannabis seeds

Techniques for Growing Cannabis in Peat Moss

Learn the top techniques for growing cannabis in peat moss.

Most cannabis cultivators have their favorite methods of growing, as well as their favorite grow media and nutrients. The two main schools of cultivation are hydroponics and soil (biological) growing.

Both methods of growing can benefit from grow amendments such as peat moss. This type of media can significantly improve the root structure that can be the foundation for a healthy cannabis plant.

Our guide on techniques for growing cannabis with peat moss breaks down the advantages and disadvantages of using peat moss, as well as techniques on how to properly use this media as your soil amendment.

Hydroponic Growing

Hydroponics is a method of growing without traditional soil that uses nutrient-rich water and an inert growing medium, like peat moss mixed with other media such as perlite to improve its aeration. The plants are suspended in gravel, water, sand, rock wool, clay pellets, or other material, and the root systems are fed directly with a nutrient-rich water solution.

Although it sounds fairly hi-tech, hydroponic growing is nothing new, and it has a fairly long history with cannabis-growing. The practice goes back centuries, with some botany historians identifying hydroponic practices with ancient cultures in many different regions of the world.

Hydroponic growers swear by this method—just like soil growers are incredibly devoted to their traditional cultivation method. Even within the schools of hydroponic and soil grows, there are a variety of methods, media, and nutrient recipes.

Soil Growing

In this article, we’ll focus on one of the lesser-utilized soil mediums: peat moss. A good cannabis soil mixture can contain any number of substances that, when combined, create a good soil mixture to help with water retention and nutrient absorption.

Because there is such a wide variety of potentially good ingredients to put into a soil mixture, the possibilities and various ratios of ingredients depend on your unique garden needs. Among the various suitable soil ingredients are potting soil, compost, perlite, coarse sand, coco coir, fine gravel, and peat moss.

What Is Peat Moss?

Peat moss, in particular, is a beneficial element to any indoor or outdoor cannabis garden. Also known as sphagnum moss, peat moss belongs to a family of hundreds of moss species that grow in wetland areas, known as peat bogs. For horticultural uses, peat moss is made up of the decomposed matter of different types of moss.

When cultivating with cannabis, peat moss can help provide two important things to any garden: aeration and moisture.

The root systems of plants are just as important as what grows above the soil surface, yet some growers tend to neglect it more, in a variety of ways. Inappropriately designed pots, pots of the wrong size, and water and nutrient inadequacies (too much or too little) being just a few of them.

Roots are the foundation for this time and foliage that grow from it. A strong root system is critical to withstand the environmental challenges above the soil such as rain and wind. Roots also help absorb water and nutrients from the soil.

Root systems must stay moist to remain healthy, and plants do not grow nearly as well when their roots are cramped in a confined space. Well-aerated soil helps them spread out and grow, which is why a relatively loose soil mixture that allows easy root growth and nutrient intake is superior to dense soils that contain too much clay.

If you’ve ever purchased a bag of soil mixture, it is likely to have contained peat moss as an ingredient. In cannabis, peat moss can be a valuable addition as a soil amendment but requires careful preparation and maintenance to yield positive results.

Why Is Peat Moss Soil Good?

Water Retention

Peat moss is a great soil component for its ability to retain water (up to 20 times its weight) and hydrate plants over an extended period of time. If you live in a dry climate, peat moss can do wonders to save you water, and the frequency of watering, as well as preventing plants from becoming too dry.

Perlite can provide aeration in any growing set-up to prevent damp moss which can lead to mold.

Nutrient-Rich

Peat moss also provides some valuable micronutrients to the soil. When used alongside fertilizers and other nutrient-rich substances, peat moss can hold on to a large number of nutrients and make them available for absorption by the plant’s roots. It also contains a range of elements, such as sulfur, which helps plants express their terpenes for better smelling buds.

Contaminant-Free

As a relatively sterile type of media, peat moss is free of weed seeds, pests, and pathogens. This is ideal for young plants that may be vulnerable to contaminants. More importantly, this soil amendment can produce a growing environment with beneficial fungi and bacteria that lead to a healthy crop.

Acidic pH

Peat moss pH is slightly acidic, so it allows for the use of alkaline soil amendments. In soils that are too alkaline, peat moss is often added to balance the pH. The management of pH is critical in the absorption of nutrients in plants. A pH level that is outside the recommended range can lead to nutrient deficiencies.

Despite these advantages, peat moss often gets overlooked in favor of other popular soil amendment ingredients, which is unfortunate.

Drawbacks of Using Peat Moss

On the other hand, peat moss has a few disadvantages when growing in soil-based or hydroponic set-ups that must be considered. From its preparation time to its unsustainable sourcing, it is important to consider these factors when deciding what ingredients to use in your cannabis grow media.

Structural Issues

When used alone, peat moss mixtures can literally cave in on themselves under pressure when wet. In large and heavy containers, peat moss can compress, which can lead to anaerobic conditions in the mixture. This means your soil will have very little oxygen for its roots and can develop a pungent ammonia smell.

Learn How To Grow Cannabis!

Preparation Time

In addition, using peat moss is not as easy as mixing it into your growing container and forgetting about it. Growers must undergo a weeks-long preparation process to get the moss ready to provide the right structure and nutrients for your plant’s roots.

pH Levels

Peat moss can be high maintenance in terms of managing its pH levels. By itself, it has a low ph. Many growers choose to regulate the pH with lime, but the pH levels can still slowly get lower, so you will need to regularly check your mixture.

Sustainability

If you’re an eco-conscious grower, peat moss may not be the best soil amendment to use. Peat moss can come from a variety of materials, but much of the peat moss sold for gardening comes from Canadian sphagnum moss.

Peat refers to the decomposed matter of the sphagnum moss and is mined from peat bogs, also known as peatland. It is believed that peat mining companies are doing a huge part in destroying these vulnerable ecosystems. Harvesting this moss can threaten wildlife and native plants found along the peat bogland, which can lead to other negative environmental impacts.

Techniques for Growing Cannabis in Peat Moss

Preparing peat moss for use in your cannabis garden is pretty straightforward but can take many weeks of preparation. Make sure to take into account this prep time when planning your cannabis planting.

Because peat moss is initially resistant to absorbing water and repels it, also known as being hydrophobic, the first step is to prepare it for soil use. This is best done during the spring months when the days are growing warmer and longer.

Prepare the peat moss for later use by placing a substantial amount of peat moss in a large pan or deep containerand thoroughly moistening it with water. Spread the peat moss out to cover the bottom of the pan to increase the surface area, and leave it outside for a few weeks. This will allow the peat moss to soften and become more absorbent, as well as allow it to grow important micronutrients.

You want it to get exposed to rain and morning dew as much as possible, but if water collects in the pan, pour it out so it doesn’t get stagnant. If you live in an arid region, be sure to periodically spray the peat moss with water.

Coarse, clumpy chunks of peat moss work better for soil mixtures than thin, wispy peat moss. Remember that peat moss must be kept evenly moist in order for plants to grow their best. Avoid letting it dry out because it will once again be resistant to absorbing water and will require attention and treatment.

After a few weeks, assemble the peat moss with equal parts of a good-quality potting soil or garden soil that does not contain any fertilizers. Some commercial soil mixes have synthetic fertilizers added, but to grow good-tasting cannabis, you want to grow organically and avoid synthetic additives.

Also purchase an equal part of perlite, which will help increase the soil aeration and aid root development. If you do not have access to perlite, you can substitute it with thick, coarse sand. Avoid any sand with tiny grains.

To mix the soil, combine equal parts of the peat moss, soil, and perlite into a large garden bucket and thoroughly mix the ingredients together with your hands and a hand spade. You want the three ingredients to be evenly distributed throughout the mixture. To do this, you will want to add a nutrient-rich ingredient like compost (you can easily make your own at home) or a commercially available product like Big Bloom.

Compost is a valuable ingredient when growing organic cannabis because it feeds the soil. Big Bloom, used in combination with Grow Big and Tiger Bloom, is an almost purely organic mixture that feeds the plants rather than the soil. So, while compost will feed the peat moss soil mixture, compost will feed the soil. In the correct ratios, they work well together.

Your cannabis plants will grow very well in a peat moss soil mixture right from the start. After the first couple of weeks, supplementing it with the Big Bloom and Grow Big nutrient (follow the feeding schedule provided for the trio) will ensure your cannabis thrives throughout all stages of its life cycle (vegetative, flowering, and pre-harvest).

See also  Mac seeds

Peat Moss vs. Coco Coir

Since they have a similar consistency, many soil mixes contain either peat moss or coco coir. Both can work well and have their own unique benefits and drawbacks. Most cannabis cultivators have a preference for one or the other.

Coco Coir Benefits

Although similar to peat moss in its consistency, coco coir has its own unique sets of benefits that differentiateone from the other. One of the unique benefits of coco coir is that its pH typically runs between 6 to 6.7, which is perfect for cannabis.

Since coco coir is harvested from coconuts, it is a renewable resource—unlike peat moss. It also absorbs water much easier and is much easier to rehydrate if it gets overly dry. It has excellent water retention properties, retaining 8to 30 times its own weight.

Like peat moss, coco coir is an outstanding habitat for microorganisms.It is also free of pests, pathogens, and weed seeds. Coco coir is durable and due to its lignin content, it breaks down slower than peat moss. Finally, coco coir is typically less expensive than peat moss—and this lower cost is something that everyone can appreciate.

Coco Coir Drawbacks

Coco coir also has some drawbacks. It has a high salinity unless thoroughly washed, and its quality and consistency can vary more than peat moss, depending on the source. It also doesn’t contain many microorganisms and few trace elements.

There are over 300,000 jobs in the cannabis industry. CTU trained me for one of them!

– Johanna Rose
Makes $24.50 @ THC +

Also, because some coco coir is sprayed with pesticides in its country of origin, combined with its tendency to be high in sodium and magnesium, means that it must be thoroughly washed and treated (follow the same instructions for treating coco coir as the peat moss method detailed above).

Which One Should You Use?

Because peat moss and coco coir have several similarities as well as differences, it is easy to see why both have their legions of devotees. There are really no right or wrong answers when it comes to using one or the other; it is just a matter of personal preference.

Since it is used less often than coco coir for cannabis cultivation and has many benefits, do not overlook peat moss the next time you plan a cannabis soil mixture. Most likely, you will be happy with the results and use it as a regular soil ingredient.

Become a Cannabis Growing Expert with CTU

Now that you know the basics of using peat moss to create beneficial soil for your plants, you can learn how to use other grow media to find out which works best for you.

Learn about all the latest cultivation methods from industry professionals when enrolling in Cannabis Training University’s online marijuana classes.

Whether it is your first time growing or you are a seasoned grower, CTU has a complete curriculum that takes you through every step of the cultivation process.

Learn about the fundamentals of growing cannabis and advanced growing techniques to maximize the quality of your harvest. Start your journey toward becoming a master grower today!

Germinating Marijuana Seeds: Step by Step Guide

The life of any plant begins with germination , making this process the most important in your plant’s life. You will undoubtedly come across many different methods for germinating your marijuana seeds when conducting your online research. Some may be successful, but others will disappoint you. The following guide will provide you with an effective list of practices and critical information home marijuana growers can utilize to help ensure they’re preparing the best crop possible to produce some smooth, enjoyable hits.

Please continue reading to find out everything you need to know about cannabis seed germination. And if you’d like even more information on the wonders of growing cannabis from the comfort of your own home, please consider exploring the top-quality grow kits provided by our cannabis industry experts at a Pot for Pot today , along with their range of expertly written educational articles.

What Does it Mean to Germinate Cannabis Seeds?

Germination is the natural process by which a particular organism grows from a spore or seed. In this case, the term is referring to the sprouting of a cannabis seedling from a seed , which can be encouraged by help from the cannabis grower. Germinating your seed is the first crucial step in the cannabis growing process, and it can be surprisingly simple with the right tools. Even though the process of getting a seed to sprout and bear a healthy plant is a challenge for some growers, it doesn’t have to be when you start with a Pot for Pot. With our help, your plant will sprout and start growing in no time!

What to Understand About Germination and Endosperm

The first thing to understand is that seeds come naturally equipped with their own starting food- endosperm. It plays an essential role in ensuring your plant reaches its full potential. As a seed begins to sprout, this starchy blanket around the embryo provides nutrients to a growing plant. If it doesn’t seem like a lot, don’t be fooled- there’s enough starch there to feed humans.

That starch is only part of what you’ll need, however. You’ll also need to provide specific temperatures to germinate your seeds. Ideally, you’ll want to keep the temperature around 25 degrees Celsius (77 F) for the best results.

What Happens During Germination?

The process of germination is when plants start to sprout from their seeds, and it’s relatively the same throughout the plant kingdom. A little bit of moisture makes the tiny plant inside crack open its outer shell and sprout upwards while pushing its root downwards. Once it’s cracked through the shell, you’ll need to give your little babies a bit of water and some love for the fun to begin.

Your seeds will need the right conditions to break through their shell and continue to grow, however. Otherwise, they may take longer to germinate. Our seedling starter kit can help you create those perfect conditions. It makes sure your seed has just the right amount of water (so that it stays moist, but not too wet). Once it has germinated and grown enough to sprout its third set of leaves, simply move your young plant into the Pot for Pot fabric pot for continued healthy growth.

It’s best to germinate seeds indoors where you can better control the temperature. Seeds are more likely to sprout in a warm and stable environment.

How to Sprout Marijuana Seeds

Marijuana plants start as a seed . That tiny thing resembling a pebble is a whole plant securely stored with a supply of food to support itself for a few days. In the germination process, the food converts into sugars, which the plant uses to cut the shell and develop its root. Identifying a healthy seed is, therefore, the first thing that you need to do.

The sprouting process is the foundation of your marijuana plant, so do not take this step lightly. Other than starting with a high-quality seed, you need to ensure that your conditions are optimal. It is challenging to optimize the natural mediums, which is why a medium such as Jiffy Pellets comes in handy.

Different Ways to Germinate

There are many ways to germinate seeds, but we recommend using peat pellets. Not only is it the safest way to start your seeds, but it’s also the easiest. Jiffy is hands down one of the best brands of peat pellets on the market , and if you are thinking about germinating using peat pellets, this is the way to go. This method is great for avoiding the risk of damaging new roots. We’ll get into more detail about the wonders of Jiffy Pellets in a later section of this article. But first, let’s explore the benefit of peat pellets in general, along with some other mediums growers can use to facilitate effective cannabis germination.

Peat pellets are comprised of decomposed vegetable matter which your plants will absolutely love. When you add water, it expands, creating a nutrient-dense medium that is a good replacement for soil. When the roots are visible, you can transport the whole pellet into a Top Soil mix with fortified Pot for Pot Superb Soil so it can continue developing without accidentally causing root damage.

Basic Mediums for Marijuana Germination

There are many different germination methods, and results will vary. Here are some basic ways to sprout your seeds :

Sprouting marijuana seeds in regular soil is a common practice. Soil is a natural medium and can protect the seeds as they develop their fragile roots. For this option, be sure to start with the right type of soil for marijuana. Use a seed starter or fertilized potting soil with a pH of around 6. Soil has both minerals and spores that support growing marijuana plants.

Water

Water is another method for sprouting a marijuana seed. This method produces a seedling in 24-48 hours. The advantage of using water is that you can ensure adequate moisture for germination. The plant will also have an easier time breaking its shell compared to when it is in a soil medium. For this method, water daily while checking the temperature, ensuring that it is around 65° F.

Rockwool

This mineral wool comes from volcanic rock and other materials such as limestone and basalt. To make this material, the ingredients are heated into molten lava and rapidly spun into threads. These threads then undergo compaction, curing, and finally, cutting.

While Rockwool is a suitable environment for germination, you’ll need to adjust it a bit for growing marijuana. First, you’ll need to add fertilizers- around 600 parts per million. You’ll also need to reduce the pH, which is too high to support sprouting. It’s also a bit dangerous to use, so please wear gloves and protect your mouth and eyes while handling it.

See also  Wild rose cannabis seeds

Would you like to save money and reduce the number of trips you need to take to your local dispensary to stock up on marijuana? Consider trying out the potential of your green thumb by investing in one of our top-quality cannabis growing kits today.

The Best Marijuana Germination Medium: What to Know About Jiffy Pellets

For the best results, you need a precise understanding of how to get started growing your marijuana plant. As stated a few sections above in this article, choosing Jiffy Pellets as your initial medium is probably the best way to go. Every Pot for Pot kit includes a Jiffy Pellet, so you don’t need to worry about purchasing it separately, and if you run out, you can order some refills or one of our expansion kits .

What is a Jiffy Pellet and How Does it Work?

A Jiffy Pellet is a natural, biodegradable growing medium conveniently available as little compact discs that help sprout seeds into seedlings. Jiffy Pellet composition includes peat moss, a mesh, and other ingredients such as lime, fertilizer, and ammonium to help seedlings grow.

Jiffy Pellets are both a container and a potting mix for sprouting seeds. Peat moss is a medium that’s rich in organic materials, and the mesh securely holds the peat moss in place. Using Jiffy peat pellets either indoors or outdoors is an effective method to grow healthy and robust marijuana plants.

To use a Jiffy pellet, water it first. Then, place your marijuana seed a bit below the surface level. When the plant is strong enough, transplant the entire pellet to a larger pot.

What are Jiffy Pellets Composed of?

To help you better understand the advantages that Jiffy Pellets can provide to your seed germination efforts, let’s take a moment to explore the various beneficial components they contain and how they work to benefit your plants.

Technically, a Jiffy peat pellet is a small disc made of compressed material. However, Jiffy pellets enlarge up to seven times their original size when you add water , creating a suitable environment for the sprouting process. The fine netting keeps the Jiffy pellet ingredients in one place as your seed sprouts. Said ingredients include:

Peat is an organic medium that provides plenty of nutrients for sprouting seeds. It is made from sphagnum peat moss, which has a high water-holding capacity as a result of its fluffy and light texture. Peat provides excellent root aeration, making it easy for roots to grow without interference.

Lime, Ammonium, and Fertilizer

Jiffy pellets are primarily made from peat moss. However, peat moss on its own is not ideal for sprouting seeds. That’s why they also include lime, which raises the pH of the medium. Jiffy Pellets have a pH of 5.5, compared to peat moss’s 4.4.

Jiffy Pellets also include fertilizer that provides seedlings with all their required nutrients for the first 1-2 weeks. You won’t need to add anything else as your seed sprouts. After transplanting, you can apply fertilizer, if desired.

How Big are Jiffy Pellets?

Jiffy pellets come in diameters of 24 mm, 33 mm, 41 mm, and 70 mm. The sizes vary to cater to the various needs of different seedlings. The larger Jiffy Pellet sizes are convenient to handle and are ideal for marijuana.

How to Germinate With Jiffy

Jiffy pellet instructions are easy to follow and will take you less than 20 minutes to set up, ensuring you’ll be able to start your cannabis seed germination project quickly and easily without wasted time or effort.

Choose Your Container

The first step is to place your pellets in a container. Ideally, you can use a Jiffy pellet tray. Ensure they do not overlap and leave a small border for water retention.

Water Your Jiffy Pellets

You can use tap water or distilled water. Keep in mind, tap water may have chlorine, which is harmful to your plant and can cause it to dry out faster. However, you don’t have to buy distilled water to prevent chlorine problems. Evaporate the chlorine by pouring your water, and let it rest for some time. Use very warm water, around 95oF, to help the pellet expand faster.

Plant Your Weed Seeds in the Jiffy Pellets

Place the seed in the middle of the enlarged pellet. Don’t place the seed too deep, or it will not sprout.

Cover Your Seeds

To avoid moisture loss, use a plastic cover – this usually comes with the pellets. You can also use plastic wrap. If you don’t have a Jiffy pellet dome, you will need to water again after around seven days. Avoid dropping water from the top; otherwise, you will disturb the developing seeds.

Transplant Your Plant into Some Soil

The seeds are usually ready for transplanting after two weeks. To do this, simply make a hole in the soil and place your pellet directly in that spot.

An Alternative to Jiffy Pellets to Consider

Coir is a popular alternative to Jiffy pellets , with Coconut Coir leading the trend. This material is made from coconut husks. If you choose this medium, use a coir Jiffy Pellet tray to hold it. Coir has excellent water retention capacities similar to peat, and it also facilitates the healthy development of roots.

Coir also repels insects and is reusable , so it can help you if you choose to expand your growing operations to include more cannabis plants.

What to do After Germination

After your seeds have germinated, they need to go into a pellet so the roots can spread out and grow. You may be wondering just how far in the jiffy pellet the seeds should be planted once it has germinated. You’ll want to drop the seed about a half-inch to an inch. If the seed has not sprouted, it’s okay to place it in the jiffy pellet – as long as it has soaked for at least 12 hours, but no more than 24 hours. If it has sprouted, drop the white root downward, so that the head of the seed is about an inch below the surface.

Damping-Off With Hydrogen Peroxide

Once your seed becomes a tiny plant, it’s now known as a seedling. This is great, except that seedlings are very delicate. You’ll want to be on the lookout for the number one seedling killer: damping off. Damping-off occurs when something (such as fungi or other diseases) causes the nutrients in your plant to stop being transported properly. The stem becomes mushy and falls over, and your plants will die young. The risk increases when there is minimal direct sunlight and air circulation, combined with warm temperatures and high humidity.

Eventually, your plant will be able to protect itself, but until then hydrogen peroxide is an excellent solution to this problem before it can begin. Hydrogen peroxide provides oxygen to the soil and reduces the chances of fungus spores developing.

To effectively prevent damping off, combine 1 tsp. of hydrogen peroxide with 2 cups of water. Use this solution to water the plants. Or you can soak the seed in 1% hydrogen peroxide before planting.

Frequently Asked Questions: Marijuana Seed Germination & Jiffy Pellets

Before signing off with this article, let’s take a few more moments to cover some key points included in this article to ensure you understand the basics of everything you’ll need to know when advancing forward in the seed germination process. We’ll also cover the answers to a few common questions new home-growers may want to address before getting started.

Germination is the process of seeds developing into new plants

All weed seeds need water, oxygen, and proper temperature in order to germinate.

It takes 1-2 weeks for weed seeds to germinate

We love jiffy pellets. They mimic the plant’s favorite natural medium; good soil.

The Bottom Line: What a Pot for Pot Can do For You

Germination can be tricky, but not if you have the right tools. The quality seedling starter kit from a Pot for Pot makes going from seed to seedling fairly effortless. It’s included in all our kits, or you can purchase it on its own. Simply select the seeds and provide some love and we’ll provide everything you need to grow healthy plants.

Do you enjoy an occasional marijuana smoke break but want to avoid costly trips to the local dispensary every time your bud stash starts to run low? Consider growing your own marijuana from the comfort of your home with one of our top-quality cannabis growing kits.

Learn how to cultivate marijuana. Find the best marijuana growing advice for seed germination, cloning, pruning, trimming, and curing to help maximize your yields.

Adults only (18+)

This website contains adult material and is only suitable for those 18 years or older. Click Enter only if you are at least 18 years of age.

FREE SHIPPING ON ALL PURCHASES OVER $25

  • Dry Herb Vaping Guide

Step Two: Germinating Marijuana Seeds and The Seedling Stage

December 31, 2018

Germinating marijuana seeds means “activating” the seed,. which is the first step to start growing your weed (or technically the second step after building your grow room ). The seed contains not just the embryo, but also the food that plant will use during its very early stages of life. When exposed to moisture and warmth, the seed will naturally “activate,” and begin using its stored food to develop a taproot and push up from the grow medium. In order to achieve successful germination and rapid early growth, it is crucial to maintain ideal conditions for your germinating seeds.

If you are new to growing cannabis, and would like some extra help germinating your cannabis seeds. Then check out this awesome video from Percys Grow Room . It will take you step by step through the germination process.

Where to get your cannabis seeds from? (Seed Banks That Ship to USA)

Marijuana seed can be obtained from many sources (online and offline), the quality and the and genetic diversity can vary based on where you’re getting cannabis seeds from. Online seed banks are your best bet if you’re not located in a region with recreational legalization established.

See also  Make feminized cannabis seeds gibberellic acid

There are many reliable outlets sell high quality seeds, here is a list of The Best Online Seed Bank for Feminized Seeds that ship to the USA, in the industry. These seed banks have strong reputations and are known for providing high quality genetics.

If it’s your first time growing, it also pays to get feminized seeds. Dealing with identification and removal of males is an additional complication that inexperienced growers can avoid simply by purchasing feminized seeds.

The choice is always up to the grower, but I strongly believe feminized seeds are a justified expensive and recommend them for any new grower.

Mature Cannabis Seeds, This Is What You Need to Do

Once you get your marijuana seeds, you will want to check if they’re matured. If you use a good seed bank, like the ones in the list above, then you will most likely receive quality seeds that are ready to be germinated.

Matured marijuana seeds shell tends to be very hard, darker brown or deep tan, with lighter accents (stripes). If they look fresh and green, it means they didn’t reach full maturity, they’re pretty much useless .

How to Germinate Marijuana Seeds

Before you plant the seeds, you need to germinate your cannabis seeds, and to do so, you will need three main things; water, heat, and air, like every living being on earth. There are a few common methods for germinating seeds, and some seed banks provide detailed instructions for how to germinate the seeds you purchase from them. Some banks also provide a guarantee on germination rates, and will provide replacements or refunds, but only when their instructions have been followed.

Although we recognize a number of methods as being successful means to achieve germination, always follow your provider’s instructions when applicable, particularly so that you may take advantage of any guarantees included with your purchase.

Now, how to germinate marijuana seeds ; the following method (paper towel germination) is the most common, and one of the most simple. Here is what you need:

  • Clean plate, and another one to be used as a cover (optional)
  • Paper towels
  • Marijuana Seeds

And here is the method:

  1. Soak 6 paper towels sheets in a distilled water.
  2. Take 3 of the soaked sheets and put them on the plate.
  3. Put the marijuana seeds on the soaked sheets, each seed should be an inch or more apart from the one next to it.
  4. Cover the marijuana seeds with the remaining 3 of the soaked sheets.
  5. Now, if you need to create a dark environment for the seeds, you can take another plate (the same size) and flip it over to cover the seeds/paper towel sandwich. This is not necessary if you have a dark place to put the seeds, such as a cabinet, drawer, closet, etc.
  6. Finally, as for how long to germinate marijuana seeds in paper towel: just give it some time. The germination period is different from one seed to another. Some seeds germinate quickly, others can take up to a week.

Check your germinating marijuana seeds at least once a day. You will probably need to add more distilled water as they begin to dry out. You don’t need to completely drenched the paper towel, but it should always be damp to the touch. Once the seeds split, you will see a single taproot coming out (see the picture below). You will know that your beloved cannabis seeds are successfully germinated.

Once the tap root is approximately 0.25-0.75 inches (0.6-2.0 cm) it’s time to move them into a starter medium (rockwool cube, peat moss plug, etc.) or soil and straight to your grow room.

Important tips to ensure successful germination for the marijuana seeds:

  • Keep the seeds in a warm environment, between 70-77°F. High humidity is also preferable; germination rates tend to be higher at around 70-80% RH.
  • Make sure to keep the paper towels sheets soaked all the time. If them seem like they’re getting dry, simply add some distilled water to keep the sheets saturated.
  • Open the plate’s only once a day to check the progress.
  • As the seeds begin to split, do not, I repeat, DO NOT touch the seeds or the tap root. It’s very important to keep this area clean and sterile.When you are ready to transplant them to the medium, use sterilized tweezers if possible.

Moving Your Germinated Seed to A Pot

Due to the limited root system the germinated seeds have, best practice is to plant the germinated seeds in small containers. This will increase the plants’ accessibility to oxygen and nutrients by avoiding overwatering.

When plants are initially placed in large pots, they cannot use all of the water and nutrients around them very quickly. This results in damp conditions that facilitate the growth of mold and certain pests. Thus, we prefer to start our seedlings in small containers like solo cups, then transport them to a bigger container when they start developing a larger root system (once they hit the seedling stage).

Here is what you need to do:

  • Acquire a small 2 inch pot (or solo cup) for each germinated seed
  • The soil you will be putting in the pot shouldn’t be dense. It has to be rather loose and airy. You generally want a mixture of potting soil and perlite, roughly 70:30 to 50:50.
  • Dig a hole approximately 0.5 inches, or one knuckle deep, in the middle of the pot using a pen, and drop the germinated seed in it ( tap root faces down ). Make sure to transfer the germinated seed gently and carefully, I usually avoid using my hands to move the seeds; a pair of tweezers would do the job.
  • Lightly cover the hole/seed with soil (enough to block the light without obstructing the seedling when it emerges).
  • Now, add a little bit of water. Make sure the soil still covers the seed after watering it. Not much water is necessary, and you shouldn’t need to water again until after the seedling emerges.

Final Steps – Marijuana Plant Seedling Stage

Place the small pot(s) in your grow room, and turn the lights on. The seeds technically don’t need the light at this point, but they immediately do once they pop out of the soil. Having the light on and waiting for the plant will assist the young plant to develop better and faster. You can leave a fluorescent light close to the surface (a couple of inches away) from the plant since fluorescent lights don’t emit a lot of heat, but HID or LED should be at least 24 inches away, if not further. Refer to the light manufacturer’s instructions to see if they provide a recommendation for distance from the canopy at various stages of growth.

Here are a few other things to keep in mind for germinating your seeds:

  • The temperature should be around 73 F at all times . Warmer temps will not cause any problems, at least until closer to 90 F. Cooler temps, however, can stunt growth in early stages.
  • Humidity should be around 60-70% RH.
  • When you water the pots where you planted your seeds, you want to make sure giving them just the right amount of water without over saturating the soil, which may cause suffocating the sprouts and kill it. Using a spray bottle can do the job; they do not need much water early on..
  • Make sure your pots have holes in the bottom to allow water to drain.
  • Do not overwater! It is really easy to overwater and cause severe stunting or even kill the seedlings. If you can feel any moisture at all when you touch the soil, they do not need water yet.
  • In 3 to 7 days, you should start seeing the first signs of your newly born cannabis plant.
  • Once you see the first sprouts; have your fluorescent lamp running 18 hours on, 6hours off in 24 hour intervals.
  • In 3 to 4 weeks, the cannabis plant should be around 4 inches high, which is big enough to be moved to a bigger pot; this is the true start of The Vegetative Stage ! If you are using a solo cup, the plant’s fan leaves should now be stretching over the edges of the cup. This is a good indicator that you are ready to move up to a larger pot.

If you have any questions, and you would like more help with starting your cannabis grow, then join the cannabis growers forum over at Percys Grow Room. They have over 1 thousand members, waiting to help you with your grow.

Percys Grow Room also have competitions, grow diaries , Guides on fixing cannabis plant deficiencies, and much more. If you’re a new grower it would really benefit your grow if you signed up.

Just click here , it will take less than a minute, its free, and your plants will thank you for it.

Here is our complete Step by Step Beginners Guide to grow marijuana Indoors

  • Step One:Choose the right strain/seeds. Here are the Best Marijuana Seed Banks
  • Step Two:How to Build the Perfect Indoor Grow Room (For up to 6 Plants)
  • Step Three:Germinating Your Marijuana Seeds and The Seedling Stage
  • Step Four:Marijuana Vegetative Stage
  • Step Five:Flowering Stage
  • Step Six:Harvesting and Drying
  • Step Seven:Curing and Trimming

Editor’s Note: This post was originally published in Jan 2018 and has been revamped and updated as needed for accuracy and comprehensiveness.

Keywords: germinating marijuana seeds; germinating weed seeds; how to germinate marijuana seeds; germinating marijuana; sprouting marijuana seeds; marijuana germination; marijuana seed germination; germinate marijuana seeds; sprouting cannabis seeds; cannabis germination; cannabis seedling stage; seedling cannabis; how to store marijuana seeds; how to germinate pot seeds; germinating pot seeds; cannabis seed germination guide; how to germinate a marijuana seed; how long to germinate marijuana seeds; germinating cannabis seeds; germination cannabis; marijuana seedling stage; cannabis seed germination time; marijuana seedling; cannabis seedling stages