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Is selling cannabis seeds legal in the uk

Cannabis in the United Kingdom – Laws, Use, and History

It’s illegal to possess or sell cannabis in the UK. However, cannabis law reform is happening, albeit slowly. Medicinal cannabis use was legalised in 2018 and CBD is now available to buy. Despite the fact that cultivation is illegal, the UK remains the world’s largest exporter of medicinal grade cannabis, and is the largest illegal exporter too.

    • CBD Products
    • Legal under 0.2% THC
    • Recreational cannabis
    • Illegal
    • Medicinal cannabis
    • Legal since 2018

    Cannabis laws in the UK

    Can you possess and use cannabis in the UK?

    Cannabis was made completely illegal in the UK in 1971 – in the Misuse of Drugs Act.

    It’s still illegal to possess or use cannabis in the country, though the penalties aren’t too severe if caught with small amounts for personal use. It is classified as a ‘Class B’ drug, along with amphetamines, codeine, ketamine and barbiturates.

    If police find a small amount of cannabis in the offender’s possession, they’re most likely to issue a warning or give an on-the-spot fine of £90. This applies regardless of whether the cannabis belongs to the offender or not. If under 18 years of age, the police have the right to inform the offender’s parent or guardian.

    According to some reports, the authorities usually adopt a laid-back approach to prosecution of cannabis use and possession. For example, rates of prosecution in Cornwall and Devon are as low as 15%, and Durham’s police force have stated that they no longer target recreational users at all.

    The penalties can be adjusted, depending on:

    • The quantity of cannabis in the offender’s possession.
    • Where the offender and the cannabis were found (for example, if it was a larger quantity outside a nightclub, there is the suspicion that the offender intended to sell the cannabis to others).
    • Personal history (previous drug offences etc.).
    • Other aggravating factors.

    The maximum sentence for possessing cannabis is up to five years in prison, an unlimited fine, or both.

    The UK’s government reviewed their drugs policies at the start of 2019. To the disappointment of cannabis advocates across the country, they announced that no reforms would be made. However, the appointed chair, Dame Carol Black, stated that she would review the impact of reform in other countries (such as Portugal and Canada – both known for their progressive laws).

    One advocate, writing for The Guardian, highlighted the advantages of cannabis law reform, stating that “under legal regulation, cannabis would only be sold to adults, the market could be taxed, policing costs would fall and there would be more money to spend on proven prevention, treatment and harm reduction interventions.”

    For the time being, though, it seems unlikely that the UK will move to decriminalise the use or possession of small amounts of cannabis.

    Can you sell cannabis in the UK?

    Selling and distributing cannabis is regarded as a far more serious offence in the UK. Those caught selling or supplying any Class B drug (including cannabis) may be given up to 14 years in prison, an unlimited fine, or both.

    In reality, these penalties are rarely imposed, unless the trafficking operation is large-scale or high-profile. Sentences are usually given based on the individual’s history, the quantity of cannabis they’re caught with, and how they intended to supply it.

    The ‘Category of Harm’ is also taken into account. It is considered a Category 1 offence if the amount of cannabis is 200 kilograms or more. Category 2 is between 40 and 200 kilograms, Category 3 is between six and 40, and Category 4 is anything 100 grams or over.

    Other acts are also regarded as ‘intention to supply’ in the UK. The Drug Trafficking Act (1994) defines trafficking as not only giving or selling cannabis to others, but also transporting, storing, importing or exporting it.

    Can you grow cannabis in the UK?

    The production or manufacture of any drug is illegal in the UK, and this includes cultivating cannabis. However, a UN report found that 95 tonnes of cannabis was grown in the UK in 2016 for medicinal and scientific use. This made up close to half of the world’s total.

    In addition to this, the UK is also the world’s largest illegal cannabis exporter, and delivers 67.7% of the globe’s total, to be consumed in other countries.

    Unsurprisingly, some have called the extensive cultivation for medicinal purposes hypocritical, given how difficult it is to obtain medicinal cannabis in the UK. Philip May, who is the husband of the UK’s Prime Minister, Theresa May, is a significant investor in GW Pharmaceuticals; the producers of Sativex, one of the world’s most commonly used medicinal cannabis products.

    Is CBD legal in the UK?

    In 2017, the UK finally recognised CBD as a medicine. The Medicines and Healthcare Products Regulatory Agency (MRHA) classified CBD as a medicinal ingredient, based on its efficacy, and the fact that it meets with their standards of safety and quality (which CBD products must maintain).

    The UK’s Home Office permitted the sale of CBD oil in the country, providing that it contained no more than 0.2% THC (the substance responsible for giving users the ‘high’).

    Licences for CBD oil as a medicine have not yet been granted, but CBD can be sold legally, providing that no claims are made about its medicinal benefits. Some retailers, such as the high street health-food store, Holland and Barrett, sell a range of CBD products as food supplements, and topicals containing CBD.

    Can cannabis seeds be sent to the UK?

    Cannabis seeds can be used, purchased and sold legally in the UK. It’s also legal to have them mailed into the country, and mailed out. However, they cannot be used for germination purposes, nor can they be grown into cannabis plants.

    Medicinal cannabis in the UK

    Medicinal cannabis products were legalised in the UK in 2018, and registered doctors were given permission to prescribe these products to “patients in need”. Access is currently restricted to a limited number of healthcare practitioners, but this is likely to expand as more doctors receive medicinal cannabis training.

    The laws were reformed based on two high-profile cases earlier in the year – that of Billy Caldwell and Alfie Dingley, who both suffer with childhood epilepsy. In April 2018, the Dingley family were forced to ‘openly smuggle’ cannabis oil from Canada to treat their son’s condition. The UK’s media rallied to their support, putting pressure on the government to review their legal stance.

    While the decision to legalise medicinal cannabis was welcomed by many, some commented that the laws were too restrictive, meaning that the products would only be available to a few patients.

    Alex Fraser, patient access specialist at Grow Biotech, told Wired: “We’ve seen a huge reluctance from doctors and pharmacies to risk their licences by facilitating access. The vast majority of people (…) are still being forced to rely on the black market to source their medication.”

    Sir Mike Penning, co-chair of the All Party Parliamentary Group on Medical Cannabis Under Prescription, criticised the government’s actions even further. He is quoted as saying: “Those responsible for this botched and cruel outcome should hang their heads in shame. Guidance and associated recommendations have effectively shut down the policy, crushing the hopes of many thousands of patients and their families.”

    • Sativex – which is only prescribed for MS patients
    • Nabilone – only prescribed for treating side-effects associated with chemotherapy
    • Epidiolex – only prescribed for children and adults with epilepsy

    These medications would only be prescribed if all other treatment options have proved to be unsuccessful.

    Industrial hemp in the UK

    The UK has a small industrial hemp market, and it is legal to grow the plant with a government licence. It costs £580 for a licence, with renewals costing £326. Growers must also provide details about the seed type they are using, the THC content, and whether or not the seed is EU-approved.

    Certain restrictions are in place. For example, some locations may not be permitted or may require screening (e.g. near schools or public areas). The local police must also be informed of any hemp cultivation taking place.

    Organisations like the British Hemp Association are trying to expand the industry, largely through research conducted at York University and other institutions.

    Politics and cannabis in the UK

    The politicians of the UK have varied attitudes towards cannabis. Many of the country’s most prominent MPs have openly admitted to using cannabis in the past, and when the legalisation of medicinal cannabis was proposed, the majority of MPs were either ‘strongly in support of it’ or ‘somewhat in support’. William Hague, former leader of the Conservative Party, went as far as to state that the current cannabis laws were: “inappropriate, ineffective and utterly out of date”.

    Norman Lamb, an MP for the Liberal Democrats, spoke out in favour of legalising the possession and consumption of cannabis. He put forward a bill that he claimed offered a “more rational alternative to this mess”. The bill was rejected by 66 votes to 52.

    Here’s a brief run-through of the main political parties and their stance on cannabis.

    The Conservatives

    The Conservative Party has traditionally adopted an illiberal approach to cannabis laws, and has often stated a belief that recreational use should remain illegal. The current Conservative government oversaw the introduction of roadside tests for cannabis and cocaine (leading to a one-year prison sentence and fines of up to £5000 if caught driving under the influence of drugs). This was heavily criticised, as the permissible levels of THC in the bloodstream were set extremely low.

    Labour

    The Labour Party has had a varied relationship with cannabis laws. On the one hand, ex-Labour Prime Minister Tony Blaire reclassified cannabis from Class B to Class C. Five years later, his successor, Gordon Brown, changed it back to Class B again.

    Despite traditionally adopting a much more liberal approach than the Conservatives, Labour has never made any mention of decriminalising recreational cannabis use.

    Liberal Democrats

    Under the leadership of Nick Clegg (who went on to form a coalition government with the Conservative Party), the Liberal Democrats declared the need for significant reform; including decriminalising cannabis for personal use.

    The Green Party

    The Green Party is the only political party that openly and consistently states that cannabis use should be decriminalised. They also advocate the availability of medicinal cannabis to all those who need it.

    The Scottish National Party

    The SNP have stated in the past that they want drug policy to become the remit of the Scottish Parliament, rather than under the UK’s control at Westminster. Nicola Sturgeon, the current leader of the SNP, has also spoken out in favour of decriminalising cannabis.

    Although UKIP is a relatively far-right party and not known for its liberal policies, ex-leader Nigel Farage stated that all drugs should be decriminalised, as the war on drugs had been lost “many, many years ago.”

    Good to know

    If you are travelling to the UK (or currently live there), you may be interested to know the following:

    • Cannabis use is prevalent in the UK, despite the fact that it’s illegal. 11.5% of young adults (16 to 34 years old) have used it in the last year, and the country is currently 26 th in the world in terms of numbers of users. Herbal cannabis is the most commonly seized drug, followed by cannabis resin (hashish).
    • More males use cannabis than females – roughly double the number.
    • Most of the cannabis used in the UK is home-grown; approximately 70 – 80% according to one police report.

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    The UK’s cannabis history

    It’s believed that hemp and cannabis have been grown in the UK for centuries. Seeds were discovered in a well in York, which experts believed dated back to a 10 th century Viking settlement. Further excavations revealed that it was mostly grown around the coastal areas, which suggests that the people of the UK were using the fibre for seafaring purposes; for example, making ropes and fishing nets.

    In fact, hemp was so important to the people of the country that King Henry VIII created a law in 1533, insisting that all landowners had to grow allotments of hemp. His daughter, Queen Elizabeth I, later increased the quotas that they had to cultivate, and introduced penalties for those who failed to meet the required targets.

    Cannabis wasn’t perceived as a drug or medicine until the mid-1800s. William Brooke O’Shaughnessy studied the effects of the plant while working in India, and his reports brought cannabis to the attention of medical experts in the UK and beyond.

    Although cannabis began to be prohibited in the UK’s colonies, it took a while longer for it to be banned in the UK itself. The British Indian Hemp Drugs Commission declared that “little injury” was caused by its use. It wasn’t until 1928 that it was finally recognised as a ‘dangerous drug’ and banned.

    Although cannabis continued to be used in the country after this, its use wasn’t mainstream until the 1960s. Hippy culture meant that increasing numbers of young people started experimenting with cannabis, leading the police to make considerably more arrests.

    In 1971, cannabis was listed as a ‘Class B’ drug – the second most dangerous grading.

    Cultural attitudes

    Many people in the UK have a relatively laid-back attitude towards cannabis use; particularly younger people. A YouGov survey found that 43% of respondents support its complete legalisation; however, nearly as many oppose it.

    When asked whether cannabis should be decriminalised or made legal, respondents answered as follows:

    • 40% believed that it should remain illegal to use
    • 24% believed it should be decriminalised
    • 27% believed it should be legalised
    • 9% weren’t sure

    The majority of British people also regarded cannabis as less harmful than tobacco or alcohol.

    As for medicinal cannabis? Another study showed that 76% of the British public would consider taking a medicinal cannabis product if it was prescribed to them by their doctor. Younger people (aged 18 to 24) were more likely to consider it – 81% in total.

    Legality Buying Cannabis Seeds in the UK

    The world is seeing a huge shift in terms of perceptions regarding cannabis. However, the UK has been largely left behind in this shift, and as such, cannabis is still very much illegal (with the exception of a few specific, high status legal cases).

    As a result, growing cannabis – even on a small scale for personal use – is illegal too.

    This differs from many other countries, where exceptions have been allowed for personal cannabis growing on a small scale. However, until the rules change, it is still going to be important for UK residents to stay on the right side of the law – and as such, knowing how to buy cannabis seeds legally in the UK could be of great benefit.

    Current UK Cannabis Laws

    The UK is falling behind many other countries globally – in particular, the United States of America and Canada – in terms of its cannabis legislation. As a result of this, ever since cannabis was made illegal in 1923, cannabis has remained an illegal drug.

    In 1923, cannabis was added to the Dangerous Drugs Act of 1920. It was then further classified as a class B drug in 1971 with the arrival of the misuse of drugs act; though this means that cannabis is not considered one of the most dangerous drugs, it is still highly regulated as a class B drug, which is the same as amphetamines. This, ironically, is a far more lenient view of cannabis than in the US (where many states have taken action to legalize cannabis); indeed, in the USA, cannabis is actually classified as a drug akin to cocaine or heroin.

    Penalties for Cannabis Use in the UK

    When it comes to first offences, most UK residents will simply be given a warning. However, the penalties for cannabis use and possession after this first offence are usually more serious, with a penalty notice of disorder being handed out and a fine of up to £80. Third time offenders and later will then be liable for imprisonment and this will almost certainly end up on the individual’s criminal record, too. The maximum jail time for cannabis is 5 years, in line with the rules for other Class B drugs; however, it is important to note that there can be an unlimited cash fine as well as this.

    With that being said, the punishment for cannabis use or possession in the UK is generally more lenient than the maximum jail time or fines, and most people – even repeat offenders – will get away with a much shorter jail time.

    Factors that are taken into consideration when fine value or jail time is being decided on usually include the person’s level of involvement in the cannabis growing or selling operation, the scale of the cannabis growth/possession, and the criminal history of the individual.

    Can Cannabis be Legally Purchased in the UK?

    After all of this, you might be wondering – is it actually legal to purchase cannabis (or cannabis seeds) in the UK? Well, luckily, there is an option available to you.

    A licence is obtainable from the Home Office to permit you to grow or obtain cannabis and this licence costs just shy of £600. It permits individuals to grow cannabis either for personal or industrial purposes (if a low THC strain is being grown that is intended for medicinal use) or for research purposes. However, recreational cannabis use or seed possession is still entirely illegal in the UK.

    So, what does this mean for you? Well, we highly recommend that you take the legal route when it comes to cannabis; though the penalties might not be as strict for cannabis use in the UK as in some other countries, the UK police are very hot on cannabis. As such, there is a pretty good chance you’ll be found out if you try to grow cannabis illegally – indeed, it’s always better to stay on the right side of the law, and after all, there are provisions in place to make growing your own cannabis legal.

    It is important to note here that cannabis seeds are actually legal in the UK, since cannabis seeds aren’t classified in quite the same way as cannabis itself. The seeds can be legally purchased for use as bird food, fish bait, or for a collection. However, it is illegal to consume the cannabis seeds and growing the seeds (without an appropriate licence) is also still illegal.

    Where to Source Legal Cannabis Seeds in the UK?

    If you want to source cannabis seeds legally in the UK, there are a few seed banks where you can buy them. Some UK licensed shops are actually able to sell legal cannabis seeds, and it is also legal to buy cannabis seeds online and have them delivered by mail! As such, if you don’t want to go into a physical cannabis seed store or if there isn’t one local to you – they are still very niche shops – then there are plenty of cannabis seed banks that will ship seeds to the UK for bird seed, fish bait, or collector purposes.

    The final takeaway here, then, is that owning a small number of cannabis seeds is legal in the UK – so long as you don’t germinate the seeds and they are used for fish bait, bird seed, or as part of a collection. However, it’s important to make sure that you source your seeds from a reputable seed bank; luckily, there are many that are either UK-based or that ship to the UK, so you won’t be stuck for choice!

    How To Buy Cannabis Seeds Legally In UK?

    Cannabis is quickly gaining popularity in the UK. As with all things new, it is important to know what is involved in the process of buying cannabis seeds legally in UK. As lenient as the UK laws are about Cannabis in comparison to other countries, the laws in effect are quite strict and anyone found breaking them could face hefty penalties and possible jail time.

    UK Laws regarding Cannabis

    Since 1923, cannabis was illegal in the United Kingdom when it was added to the Dangerous Drugs Act of 1920. In 1971, the Misuse of Drugs Act was passed where drugs were classified into either Class A, B or C categories. Class A drugs are those that are the most dangerous and carry the harshest punishments. Cannabis is in Class B; they are in the same class as amphetamines while Class C drugs are those that have the lowest capacity for harm. This differs in the USA where cannabis is placed in the same level as harder drugs such as heroin and cocaine.

    When the Act was passed, the maximum penalties for cannabis were increased. Anyone above the age of 18 who is charged with the use, growth, possession or selling of cannabis in the UK in 2020 can have their money or property confiscated as per the Drug Trafficking Offenses act. The law is also on the side of financial institutions who are encouraged to report any suspected incidences of dealing.

    For anyone 18 years and above, the police can issue a warning for a first-time offender. The written warning will not appear on the CRB (Criminal Records Bureau) which is used by employers and won’t appear on the PNC (Police National Computer).

    For a second offense for possession of cannabis, expect to get a Penalty Notice of Disorder. This means you are subject to an £80 fine to be paid within 14 days. Failure to do so results in a mandated court appearance.

    For third time offenders, you will be arrested and the court will impose their sentence and this is likely to end up on your criminal record.

    The factors that will be considered when passing the court sentence include one’s level of involvement in the operation, the persons criminal history and the size/quantity of the cannabis they had.

    The maximum imprisonment penalty for possessing a Class B drug such as cannabis is 5 years, an unlimited cash fine or both. Most times, when people are caught with cannabis seeds or a small amount of cannabis, they might not be subject to the maximum sentence for possession. Even those with repeat offences normally get short prison sentences.

    So how do you legally buy and sell cannabis seeds in the UK?

    Since 2020, the legal route involved getting a license from the Home Office.

    To get the licence, you must complete a criminal records check and meet specific guidelines. The cost of a licence is nearly £600 and people can grow the plant for research purposes or one can grow low THC varieties ideal for industrial hemp.

    With all the laws in place, the best way is to buy cannabis seeds is to do so legally since there are provisions for this in the UK. This applies to both low and high THC strains, fiber and hemp oil are also legal.

    You can buy marijuana seeds online in the UK from seeds banks. There are lots of best seed bank UK to buy cannabis seeds for growing.

    Buying cannabis seeds need not be done in person, it can easily and discretely be done online here. There are quite a number of strains available from seed banks that ship to the UK. Be sure to choose a reputable web-based shop to get the best seeds.

    Keep in mind, when buying anything cannabis related, check the current local laws since legislation changes often and it may vary depending on your location or where you intend to ship it to.

    It is currently legal for UK residents to purchase seeds from UK seed banks. It is also legal to possess cannabis seeds of all strains, yet it is still illegal to grow your own marijuana plants from the seeds purchased.

    State Regulations

    In the UK, it is legal to buy, sell and trade Cannabis seeds. Other state laws surrounding cannabis seeds include;

    1. People are allowed to sell seeds and can sell it over the counter or by delivering to one’s mailing address.
    2. There are rules governing the quantity you can possess. Having extra seeds than what is mandated can cause issues in the future.
    3. If you are caught selling or cultivating cannabis seeds for commercial use, you could face serious consequences.
    4. There are UK licensed shops that can sell highly potent cannabis seeds.

    You can possess cannabis seeds if you are using it as bird food, fish bait or as a collection item. Consumption of cannabis seeds is prohibited. The question would be, how the authorities determine what you intend to do with the seeds. In event you are caught with the seeds or with marijuana, there are various processes to go through to prove that they were not used for cultivation or consumption.

    What about medical marijuana?

    Medical cannabis is only available in pharmaceutical or synthetic forms. A patient can get a prescription for Nabilone, which is a synthetic cannabinoid used for neuropathic pain. The other drug that is available is called Sativex which is available in the UK but it is quite pricey.

    For patients with chronic pain seeking to take cannabis to deal with their condition, they may request doctors to prescribe cannabis and they can get it when they go to other European countries such as the Netherlands. However, they may not be able to come back with it and enter the country with the medical marijuana they got from another country other than within the UK.

    Selling Cannabis seeds

    If you are interested in the business of selling cannabis seeds, there are a number of steps to follow to ensure your store is legal.

    The first step is to create awareness to customers that they are not allowed to consume or cultivate them. They can only collect them of use them for bird food or fish bait.

    As a shop owner, you are not allowed to cultivate the seeds and you need to convince the authorities that you have no intent to do so, that your role is only to sell the seeds. Your shop will need to be approved by the relevant autorities.

    Conclusion

    It is easy to buy cannabis seeds legally in the UK, choose reputable online stores to get your seeds quickly and discreetly.