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Individual medical cannabis seeds for mmj holders only

Individual medical cannabis seeds for mmj holders only

The South Dakota Medical Cannabis Program performed a random drawing on Wednesday, April 20, at 3:00PM CST to determine successful applicants for dispensary, manufacturing, and cultivation certification in the city of North Sioux City. The drawing was held at the South Dakota Lottery on the third floor of the Dolly-Reed Plaza, 711 East Wells Avenue, Pierre, SD. Members of the public had the opportunity to view the drawing live through a viewing window or via videoconference.

RAPID CITY DISPENSARY LOTTERY DRAWING

The South Dakota Medical Cannabis Program performed a random drawing on Wednesday, March 9, at 3:00 PM CST to determine successful applicants for dispensary certification in Rapid City. The drawing was held at South Dakota Lottery on the third floor of the Dolly-Reed Plaza, 711 East Wells Avenue, Pierre, SD. Members of the public had the opportunity to view the drawing live through a viewing window or via videoconference.

RANDOM DRAWING TO DETERMINE SUCCESSFUL APPLICANTS FOR DISPENSARY CERTIFICATION IN THE CITY OF YANKTON

The South Dakota Medical Cannabis Program performed a random drawing on Wednesday, January 26, at 3:30PM CST to determine successful applicants for dispensary certification in the City of Yankton. The drawing was held at South Dakota Lottery on the third floor of the Dolly-Reed Plaza, 711 East Wells Avenue, Pierre, SD. Members of the public had the opportunity to view the drawing live through a viewing window or via videoconference.

FIRST ESTABLISHMENT REGISTRATION CERTIFICATIONS ISSUED

The Department of Health has issued South Dakota’s first medical cannabis establishment registration certificates to dispensaries from Watertown and Keystone. Certified establishments will be listed on the Medcannabis.sd.gov website. As staff continue to review applications, additional registration certificates will be issued in the coming weeks.

APPLICATION REVIEW CHECKLIST NOW AVAILABLE

To aid medical cannabis establishment applicants, the checklist that Department of Health staff will utilize to review and certify medical cannabis establishments is now available to the public. In preparing applications for individual establishment types, refer to this checklist to make sure required information is provided in all applications.

Notice of Intent to Award Issued to Metrc

Metrc, LLC has been issued an “intent to award” letter. Upon contract approval, they will design and implement a “seed to sale” inventory tracking system to help monitor the South Dakota medical cannabis program.

Patient Application Portal Now Available for Physician Certifications

Physicians can now access the medical cannabis patient portal and begin certifying medical cannabis patients. Once certified by a physician, patients will then be able to access the online application process and complete their applications. Approved applicants will have a medical cannabis patient card mailed to them.

Information pertaining to establishment applications that must be submitted to the department by November 1, 2021 pursuant to ARSD 44:90:03:12

The Department of Health has released information pertaining to establishment applications that must be submitted to the department by November 1, 2021 pursuant to ARSD 44:90:03:12. Applicants will be allowed to submit establishment applications without a sales tax ID, so long as the application is supplemented with a sales tax ID within 14 days of submission. Applicants will also be allowed to submit applications without a completed Form E, so long as the application is supplemented with an executed Form E within 90 days of submission. Please see the updated FAQs for more information.

Establishment Application Now Available

Click below to apply for a medical cannabis establishment registration certificate with the Department of Health.

Establishment Application Checklist Available

In preparing to apply for a medical cannabis establishment registration certificate with the Department of Health, applicants may utilize this checklist to ensure they are prepared to answer all questions and gather all required documents. Applications will be available soon!

Updated Reverted Rules

The South Dakota Department of Health released updated reverted rules related to implementation of the state’s Medical Cannabis Program.

Medical Cannabis Program Rules Pass Interim Rules Review Committee

The Legislature’s Interim Rules Review Committee approved the Department of Health’s proposed administrative rules to establish a medical cannabis program in South Dakota. The legislature approved 143 of 149 proposed rules.

Department of Health Presented Proposed Administrative Rules to the Legislature Interim Rules Review Committee

The Department of Health presented to the Legislature Interim Rules Review Committee its proposed administrative rules.

Department of Health released latest draft of its proposed administrative rules

The Department of Health released the latest draft of its proposed administrative rules for the South Dakota Medical Cannabis program.

Department of Health Holds Medical Cannabis Public Hearing

The Department of Health held an in-person/virtual public hearing in Pierre to consider the adoption and amendment of proposed rules for South Dakota medical cannabis program as required by SDCL 34-20G.

**Please note due to technical difficulties, some portions of the hearing may not have audio.

South Dakota Department of Health Notice of Public Hearing to Adopt Rules

The South Dakota Department of Health announced that a public hearing will be held on August 18, 2021, from 1:30 to 3:30 p.m. CDT, in Conference Room 3 of the Kneip Building, 700 Governor’s Drive in Pierre, SD to consider the adoption and amendment of proposed rules for South Dakota medical cannabis program as required by SDCL 34-20G.

RFP for Cannabis Seed to Sale Tracking System – RFP ID#2439

The South Dakota Department of Health (SD-DOH) and the South Dakota Department of Revenue (SD-DOR) are jointly issuing a request for proposal (RFP) (ID #2439) to acquire a cannabis tracking system to be used to support the final implementation of the South Dakota medical cannabis program.

Highway Patrol Framework for Implementation of IM-26 & Debilitating Conditions

Department of Health Holds
Medical Cannabis Zoom Sessions

The Department of Health held four zoom sessions with stakeholders to receive input on the proposed Administrative Rules. Participants included business establishments, law enforcement representatives, local municipalities and health care providers.

Department of Health Hosts
Medical Cannabis Telephone Town Halls

The Department of Health hosted two tele-townhalls to receive public input on the proposed draft rules of medical cannabis in South Dakota.

Recent Events

  • March 9, 2022: The South Dakota Medical Cannabis Program performed a random drawing to determine successful applicants for dispensary certification in Rapid City. The drawing was held at South Dakota Lottery on the third floor of the Dolly-Reed Plaza, 711 East Wells Avenue, Pierre, SD. Members of the public had the opportunity to view the drawing live through a viewing window or via videoconference.
  • January 26, 2022: The South Dakota Medical Cannabis Program performed a random drawing to determine successful applicants for dispensary certification in the City of Yankton. The drawing was held at South Dakota Lottery on the third floor of the Dolly-Reed Plaza, 711 East Wells Avenue, Pierre, SD. Members of the public had the opportunity to view the drawing live through a viewing window or via videoconference.
  • January 19, 2022: The Department of Health has issued the first medical cannabis establishment registration certificates to dispensaries in Watertown and Keystone, South Dakota.
  • November 18, 2021: Today, in accordance with SDCL 34-20G and the unwavering commitment of Governor Noem and the South Dakota Department of Health to deliver a safe and responsible medical cannabis program, the first medical cannabis patient cards were printed and issued. See news release here.
  • November 8, 2021: Physicians can now access the medical cannabis patient portal and begin certifying medical cannabis patients. Once certified by a physician, patients will then be able to access the online application process and complete their applications. Approved applicants will have a medical cannabis patient card mailed to them. See Patient Process Overview for more information.
  • October 26, 2021: The Rules Review Committee approved the Department of Health Revised Rules with a 6-0 vote.
  • October 25, 2021: The South Dakota Department of Health released medical cannabis establishment application form.

Former SD Secretary of Health, Kim Malsam-Rysdon, seeks input from the State Medical Association on medical cannabis at their annual conference in Sioux Falls.

frequently asked questions

Patient Information

Any sale or purchase of medical cannabis must comply with SDCL 34-20G and ARSD 44:90. Any sale or purchase of cannabis outside of the regulated medical cannabis establishments is illegal.

Under the new law passed by the voters, a condition that allows a patient to use medical cannabis must be a “debilitating medical condition,” which is defined by SDCL 34-20G-1 as “a chronic or debilitating disease or medical condition or its treatment that produces one or more of the following: cachexia or wasting syndrome; severe, debilitating pain; severe nausea; seizures; or severe and persistent muscle spasms, including those characteristic of multiple sclerosis”.

ARSD 44:90:02 establishes the requirements for applying for a medical cannabis card including:

  • A photocopy of an unexpired form of identification (e.g., driver’s license, passport, US government-issued ID card, tribal ID card, student ID card);
  • A passport-quality photo; and
  • A $75 fee. Low-income individuals (those with gross monthly household income 130% of the federal poverty level) can request a reduced fee by providing documentation of household income.

Applications for a medical cannabis card cannot be processed until the South Dakota Medical Cannabis Program receives the certification for medical cannabis use by the patient’s physician. Click here for an overview of the patient process.

Per 44:90:04:04, a photograph meeting all the following requirements:
(a) A high resolution color photo that is not blurry, grainy, pixelated, or digitally altered;
(b) Uses a clear image of the individual’s face without filters;
(c) Uses a plain white or off-white background;
(d) Is two by two inches in size;
(e) Is printed on matte or glossy photo quality paper; and
(f) Is not damaged with holes, creases, or smudges;

The South Dakota Medical Cannabis Program began accepting applications from qualifying patients on November 8, 2021. Click here for an overview of the patient process.

Per SDCL 34-20G-1, physicians with authority to prescribe drugs must provide a written certification stating that in their professional opinion the patient is likely to receive therapeutic or palliative benefit from the medical use of cannabis to treat or alleviate the patient’s debilitating condition or symptom associated with the debilitating condition. The document must affirm that it is made in the course of a bona fide practitioner-patient relationship and must also specify the qualifying patient’s debilitating medical condition. An in-person assessment is required. Physician participation in the medical cannabis patient certification process is voluntary.

No, the South Dakota Medical Cannabis Program does not maintain a list of physicians who will provide a certification for medical cannabis use.

Yes, so long as the designated caregiver:

  • Is at least twenty-one years of age;
  • Has agreed to assist with a qualifying patient’s medical use of cannabis;
  • Has not been convicted of a disqualifying felony offense; and
  • Assists no more than five qualifying patients with the medical use of cannabis, unless the designated caregiver’s qualifying patients each reside in or are admitted to a health care facility or residential care facility where the designated caregiver is employed.

As part of the application process to obtain a registry identification card for the South Dakota Medical Cannabis Program, applicants may also apply to cultivate three cannabis plants in their home. An application to cultivate more than three plants simultaneously for a single patient’s use must be accompanied by a certification from the individual’s physician authorizing cultivation of an extended plant count.

Highway Patrol personnel will not, at the scene of a stop or interaction, arrest a South Dakota resident who is unable to present an unexpired medical cannabis card, as long each of the following apply:

  • The individual possesses no more than three ounces of natural and unaltered marijuana, as defined by SDCL 22-42-1;
  • The individual claims at the time of the interaction that the medical cannabis is to treat or alleviate a debilitating medical condition as defined by SDCL 34-20-1;
  • The individual produces printed or electronic documentation relative to the debilitating medical condition from a licensed medical doctor.

Highway Patrol personnel will not arrest nonresident or tribal cardholders for possession of cannabis, nor will they seize the cannabis or any associated paraphernalia, if the following applies:

  • The cardholder presents an unexpired medical cannabis card issued by another state; and
  • He or she possesses no more than three ounces of natural and unaltered cannabis, as defined by SDCL 22-42-1.

South Dakota’s impaired driving laws still apply. An individual may not operate a motor vehicle under the influence of medical cannabis. Drivers are prohibited from smoking or consuming cannabis or cannabis concentrate. Passengers are also prohibited from smoking cannabis or cannabis concentrate.

Initiated Measure 26 became SDCL 34-20G. Administrative rules for the program can be found at ARSD 44:90.

The South Dakota Medical Cannabis Program is in the final stages of implementing a statewide patient registry, verification, and licensing system that will ensure that only verified patients and caregivers have access to medical cannabis. The patient verification system will also ensure that South Dakota law enforcement officials have the necessary tools to accurately identify medical cannabis patients/caregivers they may encounter.

The South Dakota Medical Cannabis Program takes privacy and health information security seriously. The secure online registry system for patients, caregivers, physicians, and law enforcement will meet or exceed all state and federal standards for confidentiality, accessibility, and information security.

The South Dakota Medical Cannabis Program cannot provide legal advice to qualifying patients as to the impact of medical cannabis use. Qualifying patients or others with legal questions should consult with their own legal counsel.

No. Our patient-friendly application process is explained here and no fee, other than an application fee, should be paid to apply for your medical cannabis patient/caregiver card. Individuals should use caution if using a business offering to assist with the application process. If you have been targeted or feel you have been victim to a scam, please report it here. Got questions about the medical cannabis program? Call us at 605-773-3048.

Medical Cannabis Establishments

SDCL 34-20G establishes the following registration types: cultivator, manufacturer, dispensary, and testing. Collectively these are referred to as establishments.

Initiated Measure 26 became SDCL 34-20G. Administrative rules for the program can be found at ARSD 44:90.

You may register your medical cannabis establishment with the Department of Health using this link.

Note: Additional registration and operational requirements may be established/required at the local level.

The South Dakota Medical Cannabis program has developed a checklist to help establishments in preparing to apply for a medical cannabis establishment registration certificate.

No, the transportation of cannabis across state lines remains a federal crime and could result in federal criminal prosecution.

For Medical Cannabis Establishment Applications that Must be Submitted by November 1, 2021 pursuant to ARSD 44:90:03:12:

Yes, the Department of Health will allow applicants who must submit applications by November 1, 2021 (per ARSD 44:90:03:12) to submit applications that do not have a sales tax ID number. You must supplement your application with the sales tax ID number within 14 days of submission, or as soon as you receive the sales tax ID number from Department of Revenue. Please contact the Department of Health with questions.

Yes, the Department of Health will allow applicants who must submit applications by November 1, 2021 (per ARSD 44:90:03:12) to submit applications without an attached Form E. You must supplement your application with a completed Form E within 90 days of submission. Please contact the Department of Health with questions.

‘They’re all plants:’ 10 questions answered about growing cannabis at home in Arizona

The passage of Proposition 207 in Arizona, legalizing recreational cannabis, ushered in a new opportunity for the home gardener. Adults ages 21 and older are now allowed to grow a limited amount of cannabis plants at home for personal use.

“We don’t see any difference between growing cannabis and growing vegetables and growing lavender, they’re all plants,” said Ryan Jerrell, co-owner of Dig It Gardens in Phoenix.

But like growing any plant, it can be easy to overthink it, he said.

The Arizona Republic asked two experts to share their tips for beginners: Noah Wylie, master grower at The Mint Dispensary based in the East Valley, and Josh Sundberg, farmer and co-owner of Community Roots AZ in Cornville, southwest of Sedona.

Wylie has been cultivating cannabis since 2002, when he first started growing for patient use in California. Sundberg cultivates cannabis for personal use and offers workshops for other growers.

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How many cannabis plants can I grow?

Adults can grow six cannabis plants at home or no more than 12 plants in a house with more than one adult.

People can grow plants from seeds or cuttings off an existing plant, also known as clones. Sundberg said cuttings are a gray area because it’s unclear whether a cutting that hasn’t taken root yet is counted as part of the six or 12 plants Arizonans are allowed to grow.

How long does it take to grow cannabis?

On average, a plant takes 50 to 60 days before it’s ready to harvest, Wylie said. Once harvested, the plant needs to be dried for about 10 to 14 days. Growers then have the choice of consuming their cannabis, or curing the flowers another week or two for higher quality, he said.

Where can I buy cannabis seeds?

At local supplier Phoenix Seeds & Clones, people can purchase a grow consultation ranging from $75-200, including 5 to 20 seeds. Strains offered include Gorilla Cake, Tangie Cookies and Kino Vision, a high CBD strain.

As of Oct. 19, the company was sold out of seeds, but people can join an email list for an update when seeds are back in stock: phoenixseedsandclones.com.

People can also purchase cannabis seeds on websites such as Leafly. Sundberg warned that quality seeds can be pricey. Seeds are also a gamble because only female plants flower, and there’s no guarantee how many female seeds are in a packet. Feminized seeds are genetically engineered to grow only female plants, but tend to cost more.

Buyers should go with vetted sources to avoid fraudulent sellers. Sundberg recommended Canna Genetics Bank, a retailer that sells seeds from various breeders, and Neptune Seed Bank, both based in California.

Growing from seed is a trial and error process and people should be prepared to “have a few rounds that are really disappointing” before they find that one best phenotype, he advised.

Eddie Smith, co-owner of The Plant Stand of Arizona, confirmed his south Phoenix nursery would be selling cannabis seeds in the future.

Ryan Jerrell, co-owner of Dig It Gardens in central Phoenix, also said his nursery plans on selling cannabis seeds in the future, as well as “starter kits” for first-time growers.

Where can I buy a cannabis clone?

Phoenix Seeds & Clones also sells clones.

A clone is a cutting from a living cannabis plant, which can grow into a plant itself. The new plan has the same genetic makeup as the original plant, hence, a “clone.”

Wylie believes cuttings are easier than seeds for beginners., but as Proposition 207 is so new, he isn’t aware yet of any legal businesses in Arizona that sell cuttings.

If people want to clone their own plants, he recommended they plant multiple seeds at once, label each plant, and take a cutting from each one before they flower. People can then grow the cutting from whichever plant yields the best harvest.

What’s the easiest cannabis strain to grow for beginners?

Wylie suggested first-time growers start with a hybrid strain and stay away from strains that have OG in the name or are labeled “exotic,” which tend to be finicky. Popular 50/50 hybrid Blue Dream, for example, is a resilient plant that can take higher and lower temperatures, he said.

Other hybrids he suggested for beginners include Green Crack, Grape Diamonds and Cherry Garcia.

What else do I need to grow a cannabis plant?

Both Wylie and Sundberg said the key items you need to grow cannabis are nutrient-rich soil, water and light.

Both The Plant Stand and Dig It Gardens sell FoxFarm soils, a popular brand in the cannabis-growing community. Sundberg likes to use Nectar of the Gods, Blend #4, which he said can be found at PHX Hydro in west Phoenix.

Indoors, cannabis thrives best in full spectrum light similar to sunlight, so a standard incandescent bulb won’t cut it, Wylie said. He recommended starting off with an inexpensive light made for growing. Sea of Green Hydrogardens in Tempe sells various grow lights.

“I warn people… crawl before you walk,” Wylie said. “Learn to get your plant to grow all the way to fruition, harvest it, dry it, cure it. Then you can build from there. Don’t run out and buy thousands of dollars of equipment.”

Sundberg described living soil, which has active microorganisms in it, as a major game changer. Compost, mulch and worm castings can be found at the Arizona Worm Farm in Phoenix.

Where is the best place to grow my cannabis plant?

Wylie said most people will likely grow indoors, in a closet or garage, for example. About 75 degrees, more or less, is an optimal temperature, he said. In a small space with stagnant air, he suggested using a fan to move air in and out. A beginner can start in a closet with a 100-watt grow light and oscillating desk fan, and it’s enough to get going, he said.

Some people use grow tents, which look like black boxes, but cannabis can really be grown most places as long as people are able to adapt to the environment, Sundberg said.

Sundberg said cannabis can be grown outdoors in Arizona, where come August the plants flower as the days get shorter and they’re ready to harvest by about October. It’s doable in Phoenix, even with the heat, but extra steps have to be taken to protect your plant, he said.

He recommended adding mulch to keep the soil cool. For a pot, the bigger the better for creating a buffering zone — five gallons is a good minimum, he said. Putting the pot in another pot or putting some sort of insulation barrier around it can also prevent the pot from directly baking in the sun.

While it may be tempting to spray your plants in the middle of a burning, sunny day, the water droplets on the leaves can act like tiny magnifying glasses. As with other types of plants, it’s best to water early morning. If you have to water in the middle of the day, first discharge the hot water from your hose if that’s what you’re using, and water the soil around the plant, not the leaves, he advised.

How much light does my plant need?

Once planted, the cannabis plant needs a ratio of about 18 hours light, 6 hours darkness to grow in what’s called the vegetative stage, which doesn’t produce flowers. How long you let the plant grow in this state depends on your space constraint, but Sundberg recommends beginners start small.

After a few days, growers can switch to a ratio of 12 hours light, followed by 12 hours of consecutive darkness to activate the flowering stage. If growing outside, the light of a full moon is about the maximum amount of light a plant should receive during the darkness period, Sundberg said.

How often should I water my plant?

Wylie recommended plants should be watered when the soil is dry. Growers can test this by sticking a finger into soil about halfway between the plant and edge of the pot. If the soil is warm and dry, it’s time to water.

Quality of water can make a difference in the quality of flowers. It’s worth filling up a jug of distilled or purified water at one of the various water dispensers around town to use specifically for your plants, rather than use tap water, Sundberg said.

When can I harvest my flowers?

Wylie said that after switching to the 12 hours light, 12 hours darkness stage, it takes about 50 to 60 days until it’s time to harvest. People can additionally purchase an inexpensive jeweler’s loupe if they want to look at the trichomes, or crystals, on the flowers. The plant will be ready to harvest when the majority of the trichome caps turn from translucent to milky-looking and about 10% of the caps turn an amber color. The plant can still be harvested a little earlier or later, however.

After harvesting the plant, the grower should hang the plant upside down to dry for 10 to 14 days, he continued. The stems should feel brittle when dried. After that, trim the leaves off the flowers and put the flowers in an airtight container, like a mason jar. While the flowers are consumable at this point, the flowers can be cured for a better quality.

To cure the flowers, seal the container and open it up for 20 minutes every 24 hours. It’s important that the flowers are completely dried before they’re sealed up because moisture could lead to mold, Wylie added. After a week or two, you should have the highest quality flower, he said.

Where to shop for cannabis gardening supplies in Phoenix

Phoenix Seeds & Clones: 602-883-2672, [email protected], phoenixseedsandclones.com.

Dig It Gardens: 3015 N. 16th St., Phoenix. 602-812-7476, digphx.com.

The Plant Stand of Arizona: 6420 S. 28th St., Phoenix. 602-304-0551, plantstandaz.com.

PHX Hydro: 3309 W .Catalina Dr., Suite B, Phoenix. 602-840-2080, facebook.com/PHXHydroAZ.

Sea of Green Hydrogardens: 1828 E. University Dr., Suite 11, Tempe. 480-967-2045, sea-of-green.com.