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Germinate cannabis seeds under light

Germinate seeds under light?

Why is darkness recommended for germination? Doesnt seem to make much sense to me, why would darkness be beneficial to the seed in any way? Just curious. I have some seedlings already but decided to go for a few more plants, so i’ve put the seeds in the pots in the same room, threw some black garbage bags over the pots to avoid some of the light + it add more moisture..

I’ve tried germination using a few methods, nowadays i always plant the seeds directly into the large pots. I’ve noticed that it seems to speed up the development quite a bit. I guess it’s becaue it’s much less stressful. I don’t get those methods of first germinate the seed using paper, then putting it in a cup, then moving it to larger puts etc.. that’s seems pretty stupid and is just a hassle imo, the seed and the seedling should be handled as little as possible i think.

ilyaas123
Well-Known Member

You don’t need a black bag over them, just treat them as any old seed and stick them in dirt and wait for them to pop out. There is nothing different about germination of a cannabis seed compared to germination of any other similar seed i.e. klip dagga, catnip, fruit seeds etc.

You do not need lights to germinate cannabis seeds and if you do then it is not at all going to help speed up the process; I mean, how are lights going to help your seed absorb more moisture and root?

cat of curiosity
Well-Known Member

light kills roots. end of story.

as for germinating, you don’t wait on seeds that don’t germ to sprout. you only plant root tips. for smaller cups, it’s called root building, you get bound in a cup, then transplant larger, to utilize the maximum amount of medium. if you plant in a large container, roots grow to the outside of the pot, then coil, with virgin soil between center and perimeter. big waste, especially if you’re paying for the privilege.

NanoBrainz
Active Member

ilyaas123: I’ll leave the bags on for now, the HPS does dry out the top layer quite fast.. and no, i’m not saying the seed NEEDS light, i know it doesnt. Just wondering why total darkness is always recommended in guides.

catofcuriosity: I’ve heard that too, but a lot of times i’ve germinated seeds in clear plastic cups, the roots has been exposed to my 1200w HPS lights, no problem at all.. The pots i’m using now are of the usual kind (black) and the roots are not exposed to light, but yes it’s possible that light maybe seeks its way through the soil and therefore it could be harmful to the roots..

I usually have 100% sucess rate of germination, so it’s not an issue that some will not sprout. If they don’t no big deal since i always have 2 as back-ups in cups. And yes i’ve also read that it’s important to build a root ball, but i’ve never seen any difference to be honest (i always examine the roots of the finished plants).

ilyaas123
Well-Known Member

Well. At the end of the day it’s all up to you and I can’t force you to do whatever so good luck. Doing what you are doing will not harm your plants but is unnecessary.

NanoBrainz
Active Member

Well my argument was that it seems unnecessary and possibly harmful to go through the paper method, putting it in a cup, transplating (some seems to transplant 2-3 times – very stressful to the plant to say the least). That’s a a real hassle when handling a lot of plants.

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But yes, each to his own i guess.

cat of curiosity
Well-Known Member

Well my argument was that it seems unnecessary and possibly harmful to go through the paper method, putting it in a cup, transplating (some seems to transplant 2-3 times – very stressful to the plant to say the least). That’s a a real hassle when handling a lof of plants.

But yes, each to his own i guess.

ilyaas123
Well-Known Member

Agreed, You do it right then you get a 100% success rate and it’s not that hard so it’s almost impossible to mess up on it unless you have really shaky hands or are just purposely trying to kill them before they even get to absorb some light

NanoBrainz
Active Member

yeah never had a plant die on me because of transplant, i just mean it seems like the plant does develop a bit quicker when not under the stress of transplanting several times.. i’m quite sure a lot of the roots are harmed when transplanting, even if very careful, the roots are extremely fragile (newly developed parts)

midnitetoak
Active Member

Find what works for you & stay with it- you don’t have to copy others or do what anyone says to make up your own rules

churchhaze
Well-Known Member

I’m with you 100% on this. I’ve never understood why so many people/guides insist on putting seeds in the dark while germinating. There’s no scientific basis behind this. In fact, for many plants like lettuce, light is required for high success rate and speed.

One experiment that’s repeated a lot with lettuce seeds is having a sequence of pulses, either 660nm (R) or 730nm (FR) followed by dark, and what they determined was only the pulse at the end of the sequence mattered. If the last pulse in the sequence was red, most of the seeds would germinate, and if the last pulse was far red, most would fail to germinate.

For example, if your pulse sequence was [R, FR, R, FR, R], it would be equivalent to [R] since R was the last pulse in the sequence and all the seeds would germinate.

Light helps lettuce seeds germinate, so why would it inhibit cannabis germination?

With pot, light seems to contribute little to germination success however.

Theory aside, I’ve always germinated in the light for years and see no reason not to. I feel like the plant wants to start its life off in the day, and not have an extended period in the dark as its first experience.

Why is darkness recommended for germination? Doesnt seem to make much sense to me, why would darkness be beneficial to the seed in any way? Just curious. I have some seedlings already but decided to go for a few more plants, so i’ve put the seeds in the pots in the same room, threw some black garbage bags over the pots to avoid some of the light + it add more moisture..

I’ve tried germination using a few methods, nowadays i always plant the seeds directly into the large pots. I’ve noticed that it seems to speed up the development quite a bit. I guess it’s becaue it’s much less stressful. I don’t get those methods of first germinate the seed using paper, then putting it in a cup, then moving it to larger puts etc.. that’s seems pretty stupid and is just a hassle imo, the seed and the seedling should be handled as little as possible i think.

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When can seedlings be put under lights or in the sun?

Not sure whether to grow your cannabis seeds in the sun or under lights? This article explains how much light you need, how to prevent your seedlings from falling over, and when to plant them outside.

“When can cannabis seedlings be put under lights or in the sun?” is a common and sensible question that is often asked by novice cannabis enthusiasts after germinating seeds indoors under lights.

For those who are growing indoors, cannabis seedlings may be put under lights as soon as they emerge from the soil or growing medium.

How much light for cannabis seedlings?

When using HID lighting (usually a metal halide lamp), young seedlings should be kept at least 50cm from the bulb.

With compact fluorescent lamps (usually 100w or more), a distance of around 15cm should be maintained between the top of the young seedlings and the bulb.

If using normal fluorescent tubes (18-36w), seedlings can be kept within a few centimetres of the light source.

Cannabis seedlings growing under lights should always be given a gentle breeze from an oscillating fan (a small household fan on the lowest setting is fine), as constant gentle movement will strengthen their stems significantly.

Are your cannabis seedlings falling over?

If cannabis seedlings grow tall and then fall over, this is almost always a result of growing in an environment with static air.

Seedlings intended for outdoor growing should be kept by a sunny window for the first week or two after emerging from the soil.

When they have grown their second or third set of serrated leaves (after the the round cotyledons that initially emerge from the seed) seedlings are usually hardy enough to flourish in direct sunlight.

When to plant your cannabis seedlings outside?

If outdoor temperatures are suitable, seedlings may be acclimatised to direct sunlight by giving them progressively longer daily exposure to outdoor conditions.

Starting with about three hours outside, at the sunniest time of day, seedlings can be given an extra hour of outside exposure each day, so that within about two weeks they can be left outdoors permanently.

Laws and regulations regarding cannabis cultivation differ from country to country. Sensi Seeds therefore strongly advises you to check your local laws and regulations. Do not act in conflict with the law.

How to Germinate Cannabis Seeds (Quick & Easy)

Getting cannabis seeds to sprout is known as germination. In nature, this happens underground, but it isn’t an entirely reliable process in a well-organized grow-op.

In the case of cannabis, it is often better to germinate a seed before planting to ensure that the plant will indeed grow and eventually lead to a successful harvest.

Duds are a common issue, even with quality cannabis seeds. Taking care to rear these fledgling plants in a more controlled environment than dirt can help reduce the amount of non-sprouting seeds and save the grower from some amount of disappointment.

There are a few techniques to consider when germinating cannabis seeds.

The 3 Common Methods to Germinate Cannabis Seeds

Cannabis seeds only need three ingredients to be able to grow: heat, water, and air. Anything that provides those will result in a sprout, as long as the seeds are viable, so some precautions should be taken when storing seeds in warm or humid climates.

Photo by lovingimages on Pixabay

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The following methods are all tried and true alternatives to the direct planting of the seeds. However, growers should take note of the color of their seeds before attempting any germination, as immature seeds will not be successful.

Always avoid seeds that are light green, as they have not aged long enough to sprout. More mature seeds are darker in color and almost brown.

1. Paper Towel Method

This technique is really popular and recommended even for the most novice of growers.

Simply take the seeds and place them between a couple of wet paper towels. Next, take the towels and put them between two plates to create a sort of protective, dark dome. Finally, make sure it all stays relatively warm (70F-90°F) and after several days the seeds will begin to sprout.

They may end up soaking up more moisture than expected, so be sure to check on them throughout the process and add more water if needed. Not too much though, just enough to keep the paper towels damp.

2. Soaking Overnight

When older, dried out seeds need to be revitalized, a good soak can wake them up when done properly.

Place the seeds in a glass of warm water, move them to a dark environment, and within about 24 hours, the taproot should begin to poke through.

If it has not, the seeds should be moved to a different environment as too much water can drown them. 24-36 hours is the maximum recommended time for this and is only needed on seeds that have dried out for a long period.

This is slightly riskier than the paper towel method because of the aforementioned risk of drowning, but it has the potential to revitalize older seeds.

3. Peat Pellets

The concept here is to use a piece of growing medium, such as widely available peat pellets, and to plant the seeds directly into it.

Soak the pellets in warm water and then poke a small hole into them, about a half-inch deep and just big enough for the seed to fit snugly into. Here, they can be watered, kept warm, and even begin to take root. The whole pellet will eventually be transferred to wherever the germinated plant will be grown.

Setups involving many pellets on a warming rack are colloquially known as “germination stations” and are very commonly used in both amateur and professional grows. Very little trauma to the seed can occur here, and the trauma of transplantation becomes a non-issue.

Transplanting Seedlings

  1. Once the seeds have begun to split the seed and the white taproot begins to reach out from within, the seeds are ready to be planted.
  2. Small pots are recommended for this stage; these should be prepared with soil before transplanting.
  3. Poke a hole into the soil, about a half-inch down, and gently place the germinated seeds into the ground. Tweezers work well here since they are very delicate at this stage.
  4. If using the peat pellet method, that can be planted with the seed, which reduces the risk of any mishaps during this process.
  5. Once transplanted, the soil should be watered with something like a spray bottle or mister to gently saturate the ground, as too much moisture can be detrimental to the seeds.
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After a few days of being kept moist, and at the correct temperature, a sprout should poke its way out of the ground that is ready to be grown.