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Cannabis seed program

The SEED Grant Program Application is Closed!

In April of 2021, the City of Los Angeles established the Social Equity Entrepreneur Development Grant Program (SEED) Grant Program). The Rules and Regulations for the SEED Grant Program can be found here. The SEED Grant Program utilizes funding from the Cannabis Equity Grant for Local Jurisdictions (CEG Grant) to provide financial assistance to verified Social Equity Individual Applicants. To date, the City of Los Angeles has dedicated $6 million towards the SEED Grant Program through funds made available through the 2019 and 2020 California CEG Grant awards.

SEED is administered in partnership with Elevate Impact LA.

SEED Grant Program Lunch and Learn

Please join DCR and Elevate Impact LA for a SEED Grant Program Lunch and Learn! The team from Elevate Impact LA will walk participants through each step of the application, provide feedback on grant assessment documents and answer questions.

Seed-to-Sale (Metrc)

We are balancing our duty to protect patient health and safety with our responsibility to provide more information about the Metrc statewide seed-to-sale tracking system. We will continue to update this webpage with information.

The deadline for all medical marijuana commercial licensees to become fully compliant with the Metrc statewide seed-to-sale tracking system was May 26.

Quick Links

  • Information for All Commercial Licensees
  • Information for Dispensaries
  • Getting Started
  • Required and Optional Training
  • Monthly Reporting
  • Zero Inventory
  • FAQs
  • Contact OMMA or Metrc
  • Agreed Order (Court Document)
  • NCS Analytics
  • Pay My Fine

All Commercial Licensees

EVERY commercial licensee must be fully Metrc-compliant. The deadline for full compliance was May 26.

ALL seeds, plants and products must be tagged and tracked in Metrc, except for dispensaries selling or transferring untagged products (see more in the Dispensaries section below).

Every licensee must be registered with Metrc. The owner or key administrator must have completed the New Business training offered every weekday and on-demand in Metrc Learn.

Once credentialed, licensees log in and access the Support page to find on-demand, self-paced learning modules for additional training.

Dispensaries

Like all commercial licensees, dispensaries must be fully Metrc-compliant. The deadline was May 26.

Dispensaries may not buy new untagged inventory. Dispensaries have through Aug. 24 to sell or legally dispose of untagged items that were in the dispensary’s inventory on May 26.

Transporters may transport a dispensary’s untagged inventory to waste disposal facilities, and waste disposal facilities can legally dispose of the untagged inventory. The untagged inventory must picked up, or have arrangements made for it to be picked up, on or before Aug. 24.

You can conduct untagged sales from May 27 through Aug. 24 using Metrc’s external transfer function. Untagged sales will need to be accounted for as described in the Monthly Reporting section.

If your dispensary purchased a Metrc-tagged product that was tested “outside” of Metrc, which means the lab did not input the results directly into Metrc, there is no deadline to sell it as long as the lab entered information into Metrc’s “Notes” section about the testing laboratory, the sample number the tests passed. Once a Metrc-tagged package has been transferred or sold to a dispensary, it does not need to be tested again as long as that information is in the notes.

Getting Started

To begin using Metrc, sign up for training to get credentialed. See more in the Required and Optional Training section below.

Required and Optional Training

Required Training

The owner or key administrator of each commercial license is required to take Metrc’s New Business class to become credentialed in Metrc.

Licensees can use the Metrc scheduler to sign up for New Business training, offered each weekday. The class is also offered on demand through Metrc Learn in your Metrc account.

When you complete the training, reach out to Metrc’s Support team to get credentialed.

See also  Gello seeds

Optional Training

OMMA and Metrc hosted free educational seminars May 3-6 for growers, processors, dispensaries, transporters and waste facilities, and May 17-18 for testing laboratories.

The seminars were held in-person in Oklahoma City and streamed online. Recordings of one seminar each are posted to YouTube for growers, processors, dispensaries, transporters and waste facilities, and testing laboratories.

Other Optional Training

Metrc offers other advanced training courses on Metrc Learn and on its scheduler. Metrc also has training videos on its Oklahoma web page and its YouTube channel on the following topics (and many others):

Monthly Reporting

The current monthly reporting process will continue through at least May 31, even as businesses transition to full Metrc compliance.

All commercial licensees must continue all monthly reporting using the OMMA Monthly Reporting Template for activity through May 31. The last template with activity through May 31 is due June 15.

Dispensaries must continue using the OMMA Monthly Reporting Template for any untagged sales and waste disposal through Aug. 24.

Metrc will meet the monthly reporting requirements and the template is no longer necessary for all tagged sales, transports and waste disposal after May 31.

Businesses reporting zero inventory will need to continue submitting monthly reports in the current system until zero inventory reporting is available in Metrc.

Zero Inventory

Businesses with zero inventory must still be credentialed in Metrc. Until zero inventory reporting is available in Metrc, the business needs to continue submitting monthly reports in the current system .

For a comprehensive list of frequently asked questions, please view this searchable PDF.

Why is Metrc the seed-to-sale provider for Oklahoma?

Oklahoma requested proposals for a statewide seed-to-sale tracking system provider. A single, statewide provider provides industrywide standardization that makes it more efficient to track activity in the medical marijuana market.

How do I get started in Metrc and sign up for training?

The owner or key administrator of each commercial license is required to take Metrc’s New Business class to become credentialed in Metrc.

Licensees can use the Metrc scheduler to sign up for New Business training, offered each weekday. The class is also offered on demand through Metrc Learn in your Metrc account.

When you complete the training, reach out to Metrc’s Support team to get credentialed.

My business is already using Metrc, and I took the required training. Do I need to do anything?

No, you’re all set. You can take the required training again if you’d like or dive into the optional training opportunities listed above.

I already bought Metrc tags. Can I still use them?

Yes! Anything you already bought from Metrc will still work after May 26, including tags purchased in preparation for the 2021 Metrc implementation.

Can businesses (except dispensaries) legally dispose of unsold, untagged products?

All untagged material must have been brought inside Metrc using the beginning inventory process, or have been legally disposed of, by May 26.

Do dispensaries need to have already legally disposed of unsold, untagged products by Aug. 24, or can dispensaries dispose of those products after Aug. 24?

The licensee must dispose of untagged material on or before Aug. 24, or have made arrangements for pickup and transfer for waste disposal.

A guide to buying cannabis seeds

The first couple months of the year is a great time to start planning your cannabis garden to get a head start on the outdoor growing season, which roughly runs from March to November, depending on where you live.

Navigating the cannabis seed market can be challenging when states have different degrees of legality. This guide will answer your questions on buying seeds so you can be on your way to growing your own cannabis.

Is it legal to buy marijuana seeds?

Marijuana seeds are considered a cannabis product just like flower, edibles, and concentrates. Their legality depends on which state you live in. People living in states with adult-use legalization can buy, produce, and sell seeds within their own state, but seeds can’t cross state lines. People living in states with medical marijuana legalization can only buy seeds if they have a medical card.

See also  Ministry of cannabis seed bank

Seed banks exist outside of the US and can sell them for “souvenir purposes,” but it is illegal to bring seeds into the US and Customs will seize any cannabis seeds they find in packages or on a person.

Where can I buy cannabis seeds?

Many world-renowned seed banks are overseas in the Netherlands, the UK, Spain, and other countries where cannabis laws are less restricted. Seed banks provide seeds from a variety of different breeders.

In states with adult-use legalization or a medical marijuana program, you can buy seeds within your own state, either at a dispensary or through a specific seed company’s website.

Can you buy cannabis seeds online?

Before you purchase seeds online, you’ll need to figure out what strain you want to grow and what breeder you want to buy from.

Because US federal law still prohibits cannabis, it can be hard to find information on seed banks and breeders. Breeders who have a long history and positive reputation are usually a good place to start.

Check out our explainer and buying guide to cannabis seed banks for more info on buying seeds.

To get an idea of what well-established breeders look like, check out:

Europe

  • Sensi Seeds
  • DNA Genetics
  • Dinafem
  • Green House Seeds

US

  • Southern Humboldt Seed Collective
  • Exotic Genetix

You can also do some research and find an online grow journal that details the whole growing process of a specific strain from a particular breeder. Through these, you’ll be able to look over another grower’s specific notes and see pictures of the final results.

If you grow some seeds and like the results, try growing another strain from that same breeder and see how it goes.

Do dispensaries sell cannabis seeds?

Some dispensaries in medical and adult-use states sell seeds, but not all. Be sure to check or call ahead to see if they sell seeds. Buying marijuana seeds at the dispensary is far more straightforward, however, your options will be more limited than shopping online.

Dispensary staff should be able to give you information on the seeds they’re selling, but keep in mind that a lot of dispensaries focus on selling flower and end-products. It’s a good idea to call ahead and talk to staff to see if they are knowledgeable about seeds and can give you specific information on growing.

How to look for quality genetics when buying marijuana seeds

Breeders talk about “unstable genetics,” meaning that a seed’s origin is unknown. Make sure that when you buy a packet of seeds that it or the breeder who produced them can list where the seeds came from and how they were crossed and/or backcrossed to get the seed that you hold in your hand. If you can’t get a seed’s history, it could be anything and the result of poor breeding practices.

An inexperienced breeder might cross a male and a female one time and sell the resulting seeds as a new hybrid strain, but professional breeders usually put their strains through several rounds of backcrossing to stabilize the genetics and ensure consistent plants that reflect those genetics.

Which strain should I grow?

Even one weed plant can produce a lot of buds come harvest time, so make sure you grow a strain you like. Note strains you enjoy when you pick something up at the dispensary or smoke with friends, and look for seeds of it when you want to start growing.

See also  How to stop seeding in pollinated cannabis

Some strains are easier to grow than others because they are more resistant to mold and pests, so if you’re new to growing, you may want to try an easier strain to start.

Some strains also take longer to grow than others. Depending on whether you’re growing indoors or outdoors, you may want to grow a quicker marijuana strain if you live in a climate that get cold and wet early in the season. For example, indicas are known for having a shorter flowering time than sativas.

All of this information should be available to you when buying quality seeds.

What’s the difference between regular, feminized, and autoflower seeds?

Regular seeds

If you buy a packet of regular seeds, they’ll come with a mix of males and females. A lot of cultivators prefer to grow these because they haven’t been backcrossed—essentially inbred—as much as feminized or autoflower seeds. You’ll need to sex out the seeds once their reproductive organs show during the flowering phase and discard the males—because they don’t produce buds and will pollenate females, resulting in seeded flowers.

Feminized seeds

Seeds can come feminized, meaning you can just put them in soil and start growing for buds. These seeds are guaranteed to be bud-producing females and growing them cuts out the step of having to sex out plants and discard the males.

It also reduces the risk of having a stray male sneak into your crop—just one male can pollinate a huge crop, causing your females to focus their energies on producing seeds instead of buds.

Autoflower seeds

Autoflower plants change from the vegetative to flowering state with age, not the changing of their light cycle. They have a short grow-to-harvest time and can be ready to harvest in as little as 2 ½ to 3 months from when you put the seeds in the ground. The downside is that, typically, they are less potent, but autoflower seeds are great for people who want to grow cannabis but don’t want to spend a lot of time doing it.

How much do marijuana seeds cost?

Cannabis seeds usually come in a pack of 10 or 12 seeds and start at around $40 a pack and go up from there. Some high-end genetics can run between $200 to $500 a pack.

Feminized and autoflower seeds will cost more because more breeding work was put in to creating them and they take less time for the grower to get buds.

How many seeds should I buy? Are they all going to survive?

When you grow any amount of seeds, a percentage of them won’t germinate, even if you get them from a reputable breeder. Always count on a few not germinating or dying off, or roughly 1/4 of the total you put in the ground.

When growing regular seeds, some won’t germinate and some will have to be discarded because they’ll turn out to be males. With feminized seeds, some won’t germinate, but a higher percentage of them will turn into flowering plants because there won’t be any males.

If you want six total cannabis plants to harvest for buds and are growing from regular seeds, start with about 4 times as many, or 24 seeds. Some won’t germinate and some will turn out to be males, and then you’ll want to discard down to the six best phenotypes. If growing feminized seeds, you can probably start with about twice as many seeds in this case (about 12); a couple won’t germinate, and then discard down to the six best phenotypes.

Make sure to always stay within your state’s legal limit of growing plants.

How do I buy strain-specific cannabis seeds?

Strains like Blue Dream, Gelato, and Original Glue have gained in popularity in recent years. Check out these resources on how to buy these types of cannabis seeds: