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5 common mistakes when germinating cannabis seeds

Although the germination of cannabis seeds is a relatively quick and easy process, it is crucial to take into account a series of important factors in order to obtain as high a germination rate as possible. In addition, it’s in our interest that the seeds germinate as quickly as possible, and especially if we want to avoid problems like fungal infection or a low germination rate.

In our article on how to germinate cannabis seeds we explain step by step what you must do to achieve successful germination. Today we will take a look at the main mistakes made during this process, some simple errors that, as we will see, can easily be solved. Let’s see where many growers fail to germinate their seeds, it’s a great way to learn what not to do if we want to make the most of our seeds.

A germinating cannabis seed

Letting the germination medium dry out

By placing the seed in a moist culture medium, it begins a series of reactions that will lead to germination in a few hours or days. Whichever substrate we choose for germination, we must ensure that it never completely dries out, because as the seed stops absorbing moisture, it’s likely that the seed will cease its activity and never germinate. Cialis for Erectile Dysfunction http://valleyofthesunpharmacy.com/cialis/

For this reason, it is advisable to check every day to make sure the germination medium remains moist, especially if a heat source is used to achieve a higher temperature and therefore a better germination rate; the heat will cause the substrate to dry more quickly, something that must be kept in mind to avoid nasty surprises. In case of hydroponic cultivation it is always better to germinate in rock wool cubes, which of course must always remain moist.

The paper towel should never dry out once germination begins

Leaving seeds to germinate for too long

Another common mistake, in this case when germinating in kitchen paper or similar, is to let the seed germinate until the cotyledons appear. If we do this, then the subsequent transplant is very difficult, and it is very likely that we’ll damage the root in the attempt. Additionally, the longer the root is exposed to air and light, the more damage will result, so it is preferable to transplant it before this occurs.

To avoid problems, it is best to plant the seeds when the tap-root measures approximately 1cm, or 2cm at the most. This will make it much easier to transplant and we won’t harm the development of the roots, which can be expand into the new growing medium without setbacks. Phentemrine diet pills http://kendallpharmacy.com/phentermine.html

Direct germination in soil

This is a common mistake that usually results in non-germination, especially if the substrate hasn’t been previously watered before sowing the seed but is watered afterwards. By planting the seed directly in the substrate, we run the risk of it being buried too deep, made worse when we irrigate the growing medium post-sowing.

To obtain much better results, first germinate seeds in kitchen paper, jiffy pellets or peat plugs used for rooting cuttings and then transplant them to the soil or to a pot once the small seedlings have been born. Another benefit of this method is that we can germinate a large number of seeds in a very small space, such as a small greenhouse, which will make it much easier to provide the correct temperature and humidity.

Temperature and humidity for germination

Cannabis seeds germinate correctly with relatively high temperature and humidity values. It will be necessary, especially during some seasons of the year, to use some source of heat to get a temperature of about 26-28ºC. For this purpose there are many options on the market, such as thermal cables or heated greenhouses. The latter are particularly interesting because they also provide the perfect high humidity environment for seed germination.

The ideal is to maintain the germination medium at about 26-28ºC and at 70% relative humidity. Lower values ​​will result in a slower and less successful germination, while higher values ​​can bring fungal or rot problems.

A heated greenhouse is perfect for germinating seeds

Planting the seed incorrectly

If you look closely at a cannabis seed, you will notice that it has a slightly oval shape, ending in a point at one end and forming a small “crater” at the other end, which is called the crown. When planting your seed (whether it’s a seed that you want to germinate, for example, in a jiffy, or a seed already germinated on kitchen paper that you want to transplant) you must keep in mind that this crown should always be facing upwards.

So, you should plant the seed with the tip down and the crown uppermost and facing you. Once the seed germinates the crown will serve as a hinge, so that the seed will open at the tip and let out the root. In case of placing the seed incorrectly, the tap root will grow upward and the seedling downwards, which should be avoided at all costs because it is likely that the seedling will not be born.

Planting at the incorrect depth

Too often the seed is buried too deep (a problem that we have already seen in case of watering after planting the seed), so the seedling may never emerge. In the other case, if we sow too close to the surface, we can find that the seed germinates well but the stem grows weak, bending and not allowing the seedling to develop correctly.

To avoid these problems it is be best to sow the seed at about 2cm depth. In addition, we can cover the lower stem as the seedling grows, so that it gains stability and produces new roots along the length of stem we have buried. In this way we can accelerate the growth of the plants.

We should plant the seed with the root downwards

Planting several seeds in the same pot

Although it may be tempting, germinating several seeds in the same container is not usually successful. In addition to the difficulty of correctly planting several seeds in the same pot, once they are born they will compete for the little space available for their roots. Having restricted root growth does not suit cannabis plants, which will grow more weakly and with greater internodal distance.

In addition, the scarce space between the plants will also mean they will compete for available light, something not recommended if we want to get the most out of each plant. The plants will produce very little lateral branching, and will center their growth on a weak main stem, with too long an internodal distance, factors that usually affects negatively on the final yield of buds.

We hope that this article will help you avoid problems when germinating your seeds, it can be very frustrating to start a grow with all the enthusiasm and excitement, only to run into problems straight away! Do not hesitate to leave us any doubts, comments or your own tips and tricks, we’ll be happy to answer you.

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Comments in “5 common mistakes when germinating cannabis seeds” (47)

Fishgutz 2022-01-16
I quit reading long back when the initial 100 seed results were reasoned. I’ll likely be missing many points observed. Simple opinion, for better than 25 million years of natural survival this plant has recreated itself for man to adapt to its uses in a very short 10,000 or how ever many years there’s been somebody crapping In a watermelon patch Surely it knows its way around a 2cm [email protected]&?ing hole surrounded by its predecessors environment. I would think genetically it knows what the !(@& to do. Especially if you are using a “Feminized seed”. Now, surely many observations have been made justifiable or not the laws of average are easily debatable, but I believe that the laws of average have established the standards many moons ago friends. Maybe I’ll fill up a kiddie pool 4ft Dia. @6 inches deep perlite and drop a 100 seeds through a pine bow from 6 feet high and then document the seeds position when it’s at rest in the perlite.. . I’m Extremely new to cuktuvating cannabis, my 2nd year. My first year turned out peesonally satisfiable at best simply because I planted shark cookies. I germinated in a paper towel, from there I rested the seed however it rested in a tub of perlite with an aquarium bubbler, also a circulator moving a solution of compost tea through the roots for 2 weeks, then put them in a small crawl area with a fan and a few lights for another 45 days, and then moved them to a bucket and put outside for the next 3 months and then brought back inside for another 2 weeks. So any opinions that we all have are open for discussion, but the only resolution for judgement is our own environmental abilities to nurture the development of variable genetics. Happy gardening friends..

Tim 2022-01-17
Hi and thanks for your comment. We’re happy that your first year of cultivation was a reasonable success, we hope that this year will be even more so! Germinating seeds may seem like the most natural and easy thing in the world, and that’s how it should be, but it’s amazing just how many people fall at this first hurdle, and when the seeds are not particularly cheap, as in the case of cannabis, it becomes even more nerve-wracking, especially for beginner growers and those who have no basic experience of growing other plants like vegetables, flowers, etc. There’s no real substitute for experience in this game, and the more seeds we pop, the more confidence we get. Thanks again for your comment, best wishes to you!

Jubjub 2021-11-19
Hello Good day I have some that looks like stale might be more than years old seeds. It was a given to me by a friend and I doubt it was preserved properly in proper containers. Will it still germinate?

Tim 2021-11-24
Hi, thanks for your comment and question. The older the seeds are, the less chance they will germinate, and if they weren’t stored in good conditions (dry, cool, stable, e.g. in the fridge) then the chances of non-germination become even greater. You can try a few things to help improve germination rates, for example, the application of fulvic acid and/or gibberellic acid will give older seeds a better chance of germinating. Try germinating a few of the seeds in the normal way and then if you don’t get success I’d look at using one or both of the compounds I mentioned. I hope that helps, all the best!

Raz 2021-09-08
I have germinated five seeds of different stains, all paper towel method. All sprouted.. All healthy.. All put in good seedling raising mix but the problem is they just sit dormant just not growing. I grow under lights. Last year.. No problems this year no growth. Seeds r less than a year old. HELP.

Tim 2021-09-08
Hi and thanks for your comment. To work out the problem, we need to eliminate a few possibilities. First, check that the temperature and humidity levels within your grow area are suitable for vegetative growth: ideally from 20 to 28ºC with 40-60% RH. Then verify whether your lamps need changing – old bulbs put out significantly less light than new ones, which could be leading to poor growth. If all those factors are as they should be then the most likely culprit is the soil mix itself – the quality can vary from season to season, even with the best brands, so it’s always possible that there could be pests or pathogens in the soil which are preventing the seedlings from making progress. I would recommend trying with a different brand of soil to see if that makes a difference. I hope that helps. Best wishes and good luck!

Fishnass 2021-08-30
I germinated in paper towel until tap root was as long as seed it curled around the seed anyway my question is if I planted in jiffy pod should I put it under light or wait till it pops up to put it in the light .

Tim 2021-09-01
Hi and thanks for your comment & question. The newly germinated seed doesn’t really need a light source while it’s below the soil surface but as soon as it pops out it will need light to prevent it from becoming stretchy, lanky and unhealthy. For this reason, it’s probably best to keep it under a light with a photoperiod of 18 hours light and 6 hours darkness for the day or two that it takes to break the surface. I hope that helps, best wishes!

Master 2021-08-13
You’re incorrect, seeds should be planted pointy end up crown down.

Tim 2021-08-16
Hi Master, thanks for your comment. I honestly don’t believe there’s a correct or incorrect way. In our time, we’ve tried germinating seeds point down, point up and also laying them on their side in the soil, and we’ve come to the conclusion that it makes no difference at all – we certainly didn’t see any real difference in the results of one method compared to another. In nature, cannabis seed dispersal doesn’t rely on the seed landing in the soil in any particular position and it’s managed to spread pretty well! That said, if you like to sow your seeds pointy end down, then that’s great, keep doing it your way if it works for you! Best wishes!

Sean 2021-05-17
I had my seeds in the paper towel for 3 days. The tap-roots appeared(not out just showing a bit) and I planted them in the soil. 3 days have past and I haven’t seen any progress. Is there a reason why this is happening?

Tim 2021-05-17
Hi Sean, thanks for your comment. As long as the soil is neither too wet nor too dry, there shouldn’t be a problem with the seeds. They can take a few days to pop their heads up above the surface once they’re planted, the root needs to work its way downwards and find a solid hold to be able to push the seed head out of the soil. Speaking from personal experience, don’t be tempted to dig around looking for them as you’ll probably do more damage than good. The only times that seeds didn’t come up for me were the times I overwatered them, it’s crucial that they get enough air at this moment and too much water can lead to them rotting quickly. Of course, if they totally dry out then they’re not going to survive either. At this stage, I’d just recommend patience, good luck! Best wishes!

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Pothead 2021-05-12
This article has a lot of nonsense in it. From Mandala Seeds: A #1 seed killer is a closed humidity dome/mini-greenhouse. Humidity domes are only required for rooting cuttings. Many growers make the mistake of thinking that they need a high ambient humidity for germination or seedlings. This is an unfortunate myth of cannabis cultivation. The high humidity and lack of fresh ventilation quickly causes fungus in the soil or growing medium and the seeds can rot! Cannabis is not an orchid or swamp plant! The seeds need a well aerated growing medium to germinate well. Seedlings also cannot tolerate high humidity and can easily be attacked by fungus such as fusarium and pythium. Only the soil or growing medium should be moist for optimal germination and seedling growth. Ambient humidity is best at or below 50%. Btw, seed should be planted with the pointed end UP, not down. Tap root ALWAYS goes up no matter how you place the seed. It’s by the nature, goes against the gravity to create a support for itself so it can push the seed out. It you put it with the pointed end down it will have to make double turn loosing the precious energy stored in the seed.

Tim 2021-05-13
Hi, thanks for your contribution. Mandala Seeds give some helpful advice but they don’t have a monopoly on germination methods! In my 20 years germinating seeds I’ve tried all different methods and I’ve found good and bad in all of them. except for the methods using moist paper towels, I refuse to use it these days – I found that’s a great way to get mold problems and a really bad start to the plant’s life! That definitely is far too much humidity. as for ambient humidity, we don’t specify anything in this post. What we do say is that the medium in which the seeds are germinating should be at about 70% humidity for the best results. There’s nothing wrong with using a humidity dome or mini greenhouse, as long as you know when to start ventilating. of course if it’s kept sealed all the time then problems are bound to arise! These days I start all mine in a glass of water with a few drops of H202 and then once the seeds open (usually 24 hours) they get transferred to the substrate. As for the point down/point up debate, I think I’ll need to do a side-by-side comparison to settle this in my own mind. I’ve always planted them point downwards or on their side and I’ve yet to see any weird stuff like roots popping out of the surface, or doing a loop-the-loop before the seedling breaks the surface. But it’s clear that the debate needs to be settled so I’ll do an experiment and I’ll be happy to be proved wrong! EDIT: I’ve since germinated over 100 seeds as a test, 1/3 of them went in the soil with the point downwards, 1/3 sideways, and 1/3 with the point upwards. Most of the seedlings broke the surface at around the same time but it’s clear to see that the ones that I’m still waiting for are mostly those that went in with the point upwards. The next step has to be a test in a terrarium so I can actually see what’s going on but I’m almost ready to call complete BS on this “point upwards” theory, FWIW. Thanks again for your comment, all the best!

Strange 2021-04-04
Pls how can i get seeds to Nigeria

Seedling is growing upside down, taproot is above the soil!

Is your cannabis seedling growing upside down? Has the tap root come above the soil?

If your root is growing straight up like in the picture below, it’s not good. This is most common in seedling plugs. The tender white root tip has a good chance of drying out or being exposed to too much light. You want to strongly consider doing some “plant surgery” to turn this little seedling around to the right direction

The first thing to do is get a new Rapid Rooter. Since your seed already has a relatively long root, cut the plug open lengthwise so you can gently place the seedling inside in the right position without having to “push” down on the seed.

Now gently extract the seed from its original home with a pair of tweezers making sure to touch only the shell and not the root (the root is the most sensitive part)! Now lay the seedling in the middle of your newly split open Rapid Rooter and gently close the plug around it again.

Most seedling plugs will go back into place easily, and you’ll barely be able to tell it’s been opened

Since your seedling has already sprouted and has been in placed into the right growing position, it’ll probably pop its head out within just 12-24 hours! Sometimes you see just the leaves, but occasionally you actually see the seedling push the shell above ground.

When this happens the shell usually falls off on its own as the seedling grows!

When Should I NOT Do Surgery?

Sometimes you can see the young taproot of a cannabis seedling but the situation isn’t as dire. If the root is already pointed in the right direction, it’s probably going to be just fine! But if you’re worried, you can cover up the root until the leaves actually make it to the surface.

For example you could tear a tiny piece off the edge of this Rapid Rooter and gently lay it on top. Or if you were in soil you could sprinkle a tiny bit of soil over the seedling. The seedling will push it off as it grows upward.

This case isn’t so bad because the root is already facing down, in the correct direction. Note: This seedling was just watered, but typically the Rapid Rooter should never look this wet. It should be moist but not shiny.

If you leave it alone, the seed will start to rise up, and open to reveal the seedling’s cotyledons (first, round leaves)

The cotyledons unfurl and then the regular cannabis leaves between to grow. Here’s another view of that same seedling from above only a few hours later. Even though it may have looked a bit weird at first, this seedling is completely normal and will grow just fine from now on!

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Most of the Time Seedlings Take Care of Themselves!

When you see your seedling looks like this, where the part of the root exposed to the surface already looks green like a stem, you don’t need to do anything.

After germination, the tip goes down and stays white, and the other side that’s contained in the shell tries to work its way up, and that part of the stem turns green. Sometimes it looks like the root is going upside down because it appears that it’s not strong enough to be able to push the seed up.

As long as the tip of the root stays wet the seedling will be fine! The “root” is the same as what is going to become the stem. If it appears green it means that part of the root is already in “stem” mode and isn’t sensitive to the light.

If you just wait a little everything will have righted itself Here’s that seedling 12 hours later…

12 hours after that, the leaves have completely emerged!

If you hadn’t been watching you wouldn’t even have known anything happened!

Putting seeds in soil , root up , root down.

Ok, so I have had success putting them root down.. its what I have always done. Im no expert but ive grown a couple times with shitty grow rooms, and they have always come outta the ground. But, I was reading a post the other day that said to put it root UP, because the root curls , and it will only have to curl once to make its way down. So instead of having the root down , where it wastes energy curling twice, once towards to “top” of the seed casing, and then down again to the bottom of the pot. u put it root up so it only curls once, downward.

Im starting to think its true, because after looking closely at a germinating seed, it down infact look like its curling towards the “top” of the seed casing.

Dirtyboy
Well-Known Member

I soak my seeds in water and just throw them any way they land on the soil and cover them. It is good to put the root down.

socom3riot
Well-Known Member

I soak my seeds in water and just throw them any way they land on the soil and cover them. It is good to put the root down.

thats what everyone says. And also what I believed. But after reading about it , and actually looking at a seed when the root is first coming out. It does look like the seed should be placed root up , as the root looks like its curling down like the post I looked at said.

Dunno , i never put em in exactly perfect anyway. Anything will work really.

Dirtyboy
Well-Known Member

I see what ya mean about the root curling. I just looked at my sprouts before coming to where i have internet service. When i go home im going to check that out. Mine always grow as well. Interesting thought.

smoky mac pot
Active Member
NoSaint
Well-Known Member

I used to put them root down. Then read somewhere to put them root up and have been doing it that way since. I think it works better. Makes more sense to me anyway.

Potgrower3345
Well-Known Member

Yea on my first grow i planted root up and they sprouted in less than 1 day. Now this is my second grow and i planted root down and they still havent sprouted and its been 3 days so now im worried

RichED
Well-Known Member

A CUT and PASTE for you all I have read ssen and heard of both up and down

Marijuana seeds should be placed with the POINTED END UP into a prepared cannabis seeds germination bed or just good soil at a depth of 1/2 to 3/4 inch. The embryo tap root emerges from the pointed (stylar) end and the natural method of growth is for this root to make a turn and grow downward (see the illustration) This bend formed by the downward curve of the taproot is what emerges from the soil and the friction of dragging the cannabis seeds upward helps the new plant to loosen and cast off the seed case when it breaks through the surface. If the cannabis seeds are placed with the pointed end down, the embryo will be required to expend a great deal of its stored energy for twisting and turning to position the tap root when it realizes that it is heading the wrong way (see illustration of germinating marijuana seeds) The seedling will need this energy to exert the forces required to later lift its head (now enclosed by the two halves of the seed case) above the soil, cast off the seed case and then spread its two embryo leaves and begin the life-giving photosynthetic process. This is a critical stage in growth and carelessness in placing the marijuana seeds will exhaust even the most hearty seedling and result in a slow start and a feeble plant in later life. Cannabis seeds should be placed in a small hole at a depth of 1/2 to 3/4 inch. An excellent medium for germination is a mixture of rich humus and fine sand, such as the type used for aquariums. The soil needs a ph of 7.5 to 8.0 and should not be so moist that it sticks to your fingers. If the medium is too moist, the seeds will rot and ferment before they can sprout. A simple test for moisture is to stick a pencil into the soil and if soil adheres to it when removed, then it is too moist. Sort of like when you test a cake by sticking a straw into it to see if it is baked through to the middle. The ideal is not too moist, and not too dry – and be sure that the soil is well-drained. Research has shown that a soil temperature that is at, or slightly above, the air temperature promotes the best survival rates and growth.

My question is in the wild when plants drop their seeds do the drop them point up or point down think about it
im not sure it really matters it has to work harder one way then the other but it would only seperate men for boys or should i say girls from woman

growtallmary22
Member

I’m new to growing and i purchased some seeds from a website. My plants are about 2 weeks now and they are about 8 inches tall with the four leaves. I think they are on pace, what sort of things should i do to improve growing at this point? I have them under a hp gro light 24 hours a day. Also what new stages should I be looking for to know their healthy?