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Can cannabis seeds drown

How to Germinate Weed Seeds
(99,9% Success Rate)

This is the complete guide on how to germinate weed seeds.

In today’s guide you’ll learn:

  • What germination is
  • 5 methods how to germinate your seeds
  • How long the process takes
  • Common mistakes
  • Lots more

In short: if you want to learn successfully germinate your precious marijuana seeds, you’ll love this new guide.

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  • Don’t learn it the hardway
  • What is germination, anyway?
  • Germinating weed seeds
  • Germinate weed seeds: get the basics right
  • Germination methods
  • How long does the germination process take?
  • When can I pot my seedlings?
  • Common germination mistakes
  • Germinate away

Don’t Learn it the Hardway

A long time ago, as first-time growers, we had no idea what we were doing. It was overwhelming and tempting to skip over this first phase; we were excited for the result, after all.

We had to learn the hard way, but a high-quality seed is only as good as the growing circumstances and the environment you provide.

The germination process is where it all begins.

It turns out that germinating weed seeds isn’t all that difficult.

With a little know-how and preparations, you’ll be well on your way to being a successful parent to a little seedling.

In a hurry today?

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Want to know what Germination Method our Seed Breeders use?

Ps. Read the rest of this guide later: we share our growth hack!

What Is Germination, Anyway?

Once you’ve planted a weed seed, it goes through a period of dormancy. When the seed splits or shows a root, this indicates successful germination. This occurs under specific conditions that involve:

  • Light.
  • Water.
  • Oxygen.
  • Temperature control.

How successful the germination process is depends on the conditions mentioned above. For example, if there’s not enough water, the seed won’t germinate.

Conversely, too much water can virtually drown the seed by restricting its access to oxygen.

When the needs of the seed (see what we did there?) are met, the first thing it does is take in oxygen and water. Its coating will break, or pop, open and a root will emerge.

A single plant shoot then appears to finalize the process.

Such a simple process! Once you have the basics down, you’re ready to tackle that first seed.

Germinating Weed Seeds

From seed to harvest, a marijuana species go through a specific set of steps that ensure a fruitful result.

In brief, they are:

Indoor

  1. Choosing your seed.
  2. Germination: 3-7 days.
  3. Vegetative: 1-2 weeks.
  4. Flowering: 8-11 weeks.
  5. Harvesting/drying: 1-3 weeks.

Outdoor

  1. Choosing your seed.
  2. Germination: 3-7 days.
  3. Seedling: 2-3 weeks.
  4. Vegetative: 3-16 weeks.
  5. Flowering: 8-11 weeks.
  6. Harvesting/drying: 1-3 weeks.

On average, the entire process takes around 3–5 months, sometimes longer, depending on the species and if you’re growing indoors or out. The latter tends to take more time, given the conditions are much less controllable.

Germinate Weed Seeds: Get the Basics Right

Nailing the basics sets you up for a good grow and successful germination from the get-go. One of our primary concerns here is the quality of seed.

What makes a premium weed seed?

  • Color: The best weed seeds will be light to dark brown. Green seeds indicate they were harvested early and/or contain no embryo inside — useless!
  • Texture: Look for seeds that are hard to the touch. Soft, squishy ones indicate they’re not ready for planting.
  • Storage: Any seeds you purchase should be kept at a temperature of around 71-77 ℉ /21-25 ℃

In regards to other conditions, lighting won’t be such an issue just yet, as germinated seeds won’t require it until the root has popped and the first plant shoot has appeared.

You may be wondering if size plays a role as well?

As tempting as it may be to assume the seed’s size is equivalent to how large the plant will be, don’t do it.

For example, a small Sativa seed might turn into a monstrous species once grown.

Germination Methods

Now for the juicy stuff! Today, we focus on five different options to choose from, depending on your needs and available resources:

  • Glass of water.
  • Wet towel.
  • Directly in soil.
  • Stone wool blocks.
  • Using the Spongepot starter kit.

Method 1: Glass of Water

Also referred to as “pre-germination,” this method involves soaking the seeds in water. It’s used particularly for older seeds to try and “wake” them up.

  1. Soak the seeds: Soak your seeds in lukewarm, chlorine-free water overnight.
  2. Float or sink: Seeds that initially float show better chances of surviving.
  3. Check for germination: You’ll see that a white root has “popped” or germinated. This should happen within 1 to 3 days.
  4. Retrieve your seeds: Gently remove the seed and dry it on a kitchen towel.


Pros

  • May be able to revive old seeds

Cons

  • Risky
  • Should only be attempted with seeds that might die otherwise.
  • despite 1 to 3 days being the norm on average, in practice, this can sometimes take up to 7 days.

Method 2: Wet Towel

Similar to the method above, using a wet towel is another pre-germination method.

  1. Wet a paper towel: Do so until it’s completely covered but not dripping.
  2. Fold your seeds inside: Tuck your seeds into the paper towel securely.
  3. Plate it: Place the towel on a paper plate with another plate on top.
  4. Leave in a warm place: Leave for at least a day and up to a week, checking periodically for any popping.

Pros

  • Old seeds might have a chance here.

Cons

  • Seeds may suffer from a lack of oxygen.
  • Mold and mildew might show up.
  • Seeds can become too nimble for a successful transplant.

Method 3: Directly in Soil

This sounds like a more natural method to use. because it is! No fooling around with pre-germination tricks, here:

  1. Use an 8-10 cm/ 3-4 inch pot: Take your pot and fill with seed and cutting soil. Press down.
  2. Make a hole: Use a narrow, pointy object to make a 3-5mm/ 0.20 inch hole in the middle.
  3. Put the seed inside: Place it gently in the hole.
  4. Use chlorine-free water: The soil should be moist but not overly saturated.
  5. Place in a proper location: Find a warm enough area for the seeds to rest.
  6. Find balanced temperature: Too cold and the seeds won’t budge, but too hot and they might dry out. If you’re in a cooler climate, use lighting for warmth. As recommended earlier, 71–77 ℉ /21-25 ℃ is ideal.
  7. Wait three days: It will take, on average, between 3 and 7 days for germination.

Pros

  • Mimics a natural setting.
  • Requires little equipment.

Cons

  • Takes a bit of a green thumb.

Method 4: Stone Wool Blocks

These are the little blocks you’ve probably seen at your local garden shop; nicely organized and packaged for root cuttings and germinating seeds. They’re also perfectly suitable for weed seeds!

  1. Immerse the cubes: Cover them with water with a pH of 5.6–5.8.
  2. Gently squeeze: Do this to wring out any excess water.
  3. Place the seeds: Plant the seeds horizontally within the pre-formed hole.
  4. Cover the hole: Use an extra piece of the soft wool to do this. Make sure it’s not packed too tightly, in order for oxygen to reach the seed.
  5. Choose a warm location: Use the temperature range listed under the soil method above.
  6. Water the cubes: With the same pH as stated in step one, water every 1 to 2 days.
  7. Wait three days: It should take around 3 to 5 for germination to occur.


Pros

  • Similar to a natural process.
  • Easy-to-find supplies.

Cons

  • Cubes may harbor moisture, leading to dead seeds.

Method 5: Using a Starter Kit

A starter kit is a convenient method that gives you everything you need for successful germination. With the Spongepot, you’ll receive a package of 20, 48 or 96 pots to get you started.

The instructions are, more or less, foolproof:

  1. Put supplied bacteria in water: Dissolve the bacteria in a liter of water.
  2. Water the Spongepots: Use the bacteria-water to water the provided Spongepots.
  3. Drain: Drain away any excess water that accumulates in the process.
  4. Plant seeds: Plant one seed per pot, about 3-5 mm/ 0.20 inch deep.
  5. Maintain temperature: Place the Spongepots in a place between 71 and 77 ℉ / 21-25 ℃
  6. Time to wait: Seeds should germinate between 3 and 7 days later.
  7. Transplant the seeds: Once the seeds finish, you can transplant them to their pot to begin their seedling phase.


Pros

  • Easy to use.
  • Includes a soil enhancer.
  • Organic soil mixture with useful fungi.
  • Promotes healthy roots.

Cons

  • Only available through online order.

We at Marijuana Seed Breeders not only care about your seeds but the success of their germination. This gemination method is our favorite! It gives us the highest success rate.

You can see how to germinate with Spongepot in the video below or on the Spongepot product page.

How Long Does the Germination Process Take?

From start to finish, the germination process can take anywhere between 1 and 7 days.

Note that this is an average and the actual time frame depends on the individual seed quality and the growing conditions we discussed earlier.

For example, is the seed large or older? Maybe the temperature is a bit cooler? Seeds with these conditions may take up to more than a week to pop.

Seeds in the ideal temperature range should germinate within a week, maximum.

When Can I Pot My Seedlings?

We understand your predicament. You want to take the best care possible but, at the same time, you don’t want to become impatient and risk the entire process.

The good news is that it doesn’t take long! Once the seeds have popped and you see that root coming through, it’s time to pot your seedlings.

This, of course, will depend on the method you’ve used, but also the state of the seed from the beginning.

Generally speaking, you’ll be ready to do this anywhere between 3 and 10 days after the start of the germination process.

Once your newly-germinated seeds are ready to go in their special medium, you will continue looking over the seedling phase from there.

Depending on the size of your plant, you may need to switch to a larger pot at some point during the process. If this isn’t done, you could experience something called “root bound,” which means the rooting system has grown beyond the pot.

How to tell? Here are some signs:

  • The new growth is fragile and weak-looking.
  • There’s discoloration on the stem.
  • May appear to be underwatered.

Another distinguishing trait to look out for that may indicate your plant is ready for a new pot includes how many leaves your plant has. On average, when plants have around four to five sets of leaves, it’s time for a transplant.

Common Germination Mistakes

When it comes to growing cannabis, there’s a slew of common mistakes that could stop you from achieving a successful grow. More specific to germination, pay attention to:

  • Leaving seeds for too long.
  • Incorrect planting methods.

Leaving Seeds for Too Long

Overestimating your seed’s germination needs could leave you with duds in the end. This is usually the case with pre-germination methods mentioned above, such as the cup or paper towel method.

Leaving your seeds for too long could result in overly sensitive roots that are easily damaged in the transplant process.

Avoid this mistake by transplanting your seeds when the root is approximately one to two centimeters in length.

This ensures the roots are stable but not overly saturated and prone to damage.

Incorrect Planting Methods

We see mistakes being made when it comes to the “two D’s” of direction and depth.

Direction

Placing the seed in its planting medium may seem like an overly simple task. However, there’s still a chance you could screw it up.

Avoid planting it in the wrong direction by paying attention to the seed’s crown.

This looks like a small crater shape located at one end of the seed. The other end has a point, so they’re easy to distinguish from one another.

Make sure that the seed’s crown is facing you when you plant it, which leaves the pointy end facing downward.

This way, when the seed germinates, it’ll sprout properly, sending the root down versus the opposite scenario of resulting in a failed seedling.

Depth

The planting depth matters, too. This will differ depending on the type of seed you’re planting and the medium it’s going in.

Generally speaking, we want to avoid planting seeds too deep, which could result in a seedling never showing up.

The opposite of this, planting too shallow, may also pose a problem. Doing so could result in weak plant stems that may not allow the seedling to grow.

Avoid either scenario by aiming for about 3-5 mm/ 0.1- 0.2inch in depth when you plant.

Germinate Away

As you can see, germinating weed seeds is a basic procedure that if done with a little care and forethought, should be a successful one.

Have a designated location ready that’s warm but not too hot. If you live in a cool climate, use lights for warmth, and make sure your germinating seeds stay wet but not saturated.

It might be tempting to use a pre-germination method, such as the cup or paper towel, but we recommend avoiding these as much as possible.

Using a starter kit, instead, will enable you to have high-quality resources at your fingertips that cover you from A to Z

Pay attention to any root growth or “popping” to indicate germination is complete.

By following our guidelines, you’ll be transplanting your baby plants in no time.

Jennifer

I have a passion for nutrition, organic supplements, and (mental) health. After learning about the beneficial properties of marijuana, I dedicated myself to writing articles that will teach you everything there is to learn about this miraculous plant. I’m looking forward to sharing with people how they can incorporate the benefits of marijuana into their healthy lifestyle: you don’t have to smoke to consume marijuana.

How to prevent the death of cannabis seeds and seedlings

Every grower, almost without exception, will have occasionally suffered the death of a plant during cultivation, just when it seemed that everything was going along nicely. In this article, we’ll focus on the main reasons why seeds may not germinate properly, or why seedlings may end up dead in the first weeks of life.

Seeds dying before germination

Cannabis seeds can die even before we start to grow them, in which case, when the grower comes to germinate them, they won’t open up and sprout at all.

The seeds of the cannabis plant, like many other types of seeds, must always be kept in the correct conditions, especially if you want to save the leftover seeds for later use and ensure that they germinate well in the future.

The same goes for unopened whole packs of seeds that have been purchased to store for later use. Sometimes, certain varieties are in high demand and there is limited stock, so the more astute growers will make sure they grab a few packs to keep in the vault until they find the time to germinate the cannabis seeds.

Cannabis seeds must be stored in the correct conditions

What to do with leftover seeds or unopened seed packs

Cannabis seeds need very low relative humidity and relatively low temperature for their proper storage, so the best plan is to keep them in a “no frost” refrigerator, in which both the humidity and temperature are maintained at very low levels for better conservation of food.

If we want to keep a seed package that’s still sealed, simply put the whole unopened pack into the fridge. The best place for its conservation is usually the small shelf where the eggs or butter are kept, although really any part of the fridge is ideal for storage.

If we want to save the leftover seeds from a pack for later use, we recommend storing them in the original Eppendorf tube or container used by the bank. In the original packaging, these Eppendorf tubes hold the seeds and usually also contain a few small silica gel balls, included to maintain very low humidity (10 to 20%) and help to ensure that the seed does not lose any germination viability.

If, however, we leave the seeds for a long period of time in any corner of the house it is possible that over time their viability to germinate will decrease, and when we plant them they may take a long time to germinate or indeed not germinate at all. it is also important to protect them from sunlight.

So if you wish to save the seeds in the best conditions, always keep them in the refrigerator, well protected from air, light and moisture.

How do we store leftover seeds to grow at a later date?

Death during the germination of cannabis seeds

Death during the germination of cannabis seeds is one of the most frequent failures suffered by every grower over the course of his or her cultivation career. There are several possible reasons that can lead to the seeds dying before they even open and begin to grow, which we’ll examine here.

Not all seeds have the same resistance to the errors that may occur during the germination process. Just as not all siblings are not all equal, neither are all seeds. By this, we mean that in the case of one seed germinating and the rest of them not doing so, it doesn’t necessarily mean that those that didn’t germinate were not strong or resistant, but simply that they were less so than the one that did germinate. If this occurs, we must ask ourselves why they did not germinate and look for any possible failings in the process.

Death by drowning the seed during germination

We start from the basic premise that the seeds require moisture, oxygen and a suitable temperature for germination; If one of the three aspects is not taken into account, it is quite likely that the seeds won’t end up germinating.

Putting the cannabis seeds in a glass of water and waiting 24 to 48 hours for their germination can be a fatal error for them. Re-hydrating the seeds in water is a good idea as long as they are not out of contact with the air for long, as they will be deprived of oxygen and most of the time they will end up dying; so if we use this method, we only leave them to re-to hydrate in water for a few minutes, although, preferably we will avoid any previous soaking or re-hydration (which in any case is not necessary).

We must maintain suitable levels of humidity for germination

The reason for this is that tap water contains chlorine, which sterilises the water to make it suitable for domestic use. However, this chlorine disappears by evaporation after a few hours, so if the water then gets contaminated, the seed can be attacked by any number of pathogens and eventually die. This example also illustrates why we must always touch the seeds with clean hands; If the seeds are handled with dirty fingers, it can lead a fungal or bacterial infection to contaminate them and severely compromise their development.

The same can happen in other germination media such as jiffy plugs, where the most common mistake is usually not draining away the excess water after re-hydrating the compressed peat. To this error, we can add that of burying the seed at more than twice its own depth, in which case it may not emerge despite having germinated perfectly well, but instead, simply end up rotting due to excess water and lack of oxygen. This error is also frequent in growers who germinate directly in the soil because when they first irrigate, the seed can be washed down into the soil resulting in them being buried too deeply, which makes it difficult for the seedling to reach the surface. It is always better to wet the substrate first, before sowing any seeds.

If you want to sow the seed directly into the soil and do it properly, when growing outdoors you must also act to prevent seed predators. Ants, birds, and many other animals or insects are another common cause of seed failure during germination. In the case of ants, they eat the small, delicate root, leaving the plant unable to develop and condemning it to imminent death.

Placing the seeds between moist serviettes/paper towels is one of the best germination methods for beginner growers. Since you can easily see if the seed has taken root or not. But we must also bear in mind that the germination medium, the kitchen paper, is made of cellulose, meaning it is an organic material that will decompose and rot, just like any product of this type.

Planting the germinated seed is also a crucial moment

It is, therefore, obligatory to change the napkins every day and a half, more or less, to avoid the seeds being contaminated by the pathogens that can appear as the napkins begin to rot. For this reason, we recommend placing the napkins in a deep plate and covering it with another one, leaving a small gap between the two so that air can enter, oxygenate the microclimate that is created during the germination of the seeds and avoiding them rotting.

Seeds dying due to lack of moisture

Just as excess water is one of the most common causes of germination problems, the lack of moisture is equally detrimental to the process.

If outdoor temperatures are around 20 to 24ºC, then we shouldn’t need do much more than start the seeds to germinate and wait for them to open, following the precautions already discussed. But in case of having warmer or cooler temperatures, we must act to raise or lower the environmental temperature for optimal germination, and find the best location for germination to be successful.

If it is winter, the plates holding the seeds are often placed on top of a low heat source to raise the temperature. We must, however, be careful: if this heat source emits hot air, the paper towels will dry out and the seeds will run out of moisture, affecting germination. If you realise this in time, you can re-hydrate the seeds and they will usually recover from and continue to germinate, although it is also possible that there will be consequences that may affect the subsequent development of the plant during its cultivation.

Not long after sowing the seed, we will see our little plant emerge from the soil

If we haven’t noticed soon enough that the seeds have been left without moisture, we can assume that they will have dried up completely, with their consequent death, and this is even more likely if the seeds had already opened up to show the root. This can also happen very easily if we germinate during summer when temperatures are high and humidity is usually very low compared to other times of the year.

Death of the plants during the growth period

The start of the growth period is a very important stage in a plant’s life, so several aspects must be taken into account so that it does not die of any of a number of causes.

One of the most frequent problems is root rot due to excess irrigation and lack of oxygen in the substrate. Up till now, this has been one of the most common causes of plant death during the growth period, especially with beginner gardeners who lack previous cultivation experience. In addition, the likelihood of this happening increases considerably in crops with auto-flowering varieties; we’ll explain what to do here.

When the plant emerges from the substrate, leaving behind its germination stage, it is crucial to take care with any excess water and the lack of humidity in its aerial parts such as leaves, stems and branches.

The proper conditions guarantee good germinación

When the plant is young and only has a very small root, its needs are few, it feeds and drinks very little. If we saturate the substrate with too much water, apart from halting the growth of the root (leading to little or no growth in the aerial parts), it creates the ideal conditions for the small roots to slowly rot. If the plant loses a part or all of its tiny root system in its first stage of life, it is almost guaranteed that it will die within a few days.

If we use a small 0.5L to 1L plant pot for the first part of vegetative growth, before transplanting them to a bigger pot, we will be covering our backs in case of any excess of irrigation, since the substrate will dry out again much faster than in larger pots. For this reason, this issue is very common for novice growers who are cultivating auto-flowering cannabis plants, where the use of 20L pots is recommended from the start.

It is often said that you must irrigate with an appropriate amount of water and nutrients for the size of the plant. As this is often complicated to carry out, as a rough guide we can irrigate the plants with an amount not more than 10 or 20% of the plant pot’s capacity. So, if they are 1L pots we will water from 100 to 200ml as long as it is not an auto-flowering plant.

If the plan is to grow automatic varieties, then during the first two weeks we water with 100 to 350ml per irrigation, every 1 or 2 days. Remember that the substrate must maintain a minimum of humidity to allow the plant to feed and continue to develop normally. If it is raining and the plants are outdoors, it’s a good idea to move or cover them, to prevent the substrate from getting soaked, which could easily lead to root zone problems.

The first stages of growth survived with success!

We hope that this information will be useful and help to stop your seeds and seedlings dying. Don’t hesitate to leave any comments or questions, we’ll be pleased to help.

The articles published by Alchimiaweb, S.L. are reserved for adult clients only. We would like to remind our customers that cannabis seeds are not listed in the European Community catalogue. They are products intended for genetic conservation and collecting, in no case for cultivation. In some countries it is strictly forbidden to germinate cannabis seeds, other than those authorised by the European Union. We recommend our customers not to infringe the law in any way, we are not responsible for their use.

How to Germinate Cannabis Seeds

Germination relates to the process of a new plant growing from a seed. It is the first step when adding to your cannabis garden. You can purchase the requisite seeds from a variety of sources. On the downside, it means that cannabis seeds vary enormously in quality. We recommend looking at reputable online seed banks to get your supply. However, please note that there are legal issues to contend with if you buy seeds. This is especially the case if you decide to buy them from a source outside the United States.

When buying seeds, opt for mature options with a dark brown appearance and a firm feel. Once you have them in your possession, make plenty of space for them to grow and thrive. Learning how to germinate weed seeds correctly is crucial to enjoying years of healthy plants and fruitful harvests. In this guide, we outline the ideal germination conditions and show you five different methods.

Ultimate Guide to Cannabis Seed Germination

In theory, germinating cannabis seeds is a simple affair. They only need three things: Air, water, and heat. The famed ‘paper towel’ method is incredibly easy as long as you follow the steps outlined below. Here is a quick overview of the best germination practices before we show you the various methods.

Water

Be careful not to over-soak your seeds. Hard seeds should be soaked for a maximum of 32 hours, although 24 hours is usually enough. Soaking too long can damage them. Marijuana seeds begin to sprout when they receive the twin signals of water and heat.

Once the right conditions occur, the taproot starts burrowing through the shell of the seed.

If the root breaks through the shell and there is no water, the seedling will die. Keep the roots moist once the seed sprouts, and make sure there is ample moisture at all times.

This is arguably the trickiest aspect of germination. You have to strike a balance between ‘warm’ and ‘hot.’ Spring temperatures are ideal in a ‘normal’ year. While cannabis seeds can germinate in colder weather, the process takes longer. Seedlings also germinate faster when there is plenty of humidity in the air. If you are concerned about low temperatures, invest in incandescent bulbs, and place them over the seed area.

First and foremost, seeds perform at their best when they are left alone! When you check them for the taproot, handle with care! Try to avoid touching the white taproot because it can easily break off.

Planting

You don’t have to plant germinated seeds too deep in the soil, or whatever growing medium you choose. 0.5” – 1” below the surface is plenty. Point the white root downwards into the earth to ensure the seedling is ideally oriented.

Are Your Seeds Good or Bad?

Always opt for dark cannabis seeds as they are the most likely to germinate when kept in the right conditions. White or pale-green seeds have little or no chance of growing.

You may have heard the age-old advice on checking for viable seeds. Apparently, if you can crush seeds between your fingers, they are ‘bad.’ First of all, they won’t be good seeds because you have destroyed them! Secondly, experienced growers know that even flimsy seeds can germinate when exposed to the right conditions.

How to Germinate Marijuana Seeds – 5 Methods

1 – The Paper Towel Method

This is the easiest method and requires cannabis seeds, paper towels, and two clean plates. A word of advice: Choose cheap paper towels because they are non-porous. As a result, you can lay seeds and roots on the surface and not worry about them getting stuck. If you use high-quality paper towels, the roots will grow into them!

It is a simple method, but also a risky one. You could damage the taproot while moving the sprouted seeds, or else the paper could dry out and kill the seeds. In any case, here is the process:

  1. Use up to four sheets of paper towel and soak them in distilled water. While you must soak the sheet, make sure there is no water dripping off.
  2. Place two of the paper sheets on one of the plates. Lay the seeds down at least 1” away from one another. Cover with the other two layers of paper towel.
  3. Cover the seeds with the second plate to lock in moisture. You have created a low-cost dome! Make sure you check the seeds often to see if they have sprouted.
  4. Keep the seeds in a room where the temperature is between 70- and 90-degrees Fahrenheit.
  5. Now you must wait! Seeds typically sprout within 1-4 days, although older seeds often take up to a week.
  6. When checking the seeds, make sure the sheets are saturated. If they are drying out, add more water.

You will know that germination has occurred because the seed will split, and a little root appears. Make sure you don’t touch the taproot when it sprouts or during the transplantation process.

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Homegrown CannabisCo are the masters when it comes to seeds. Offering a massive variety of cannabis seeds that are well categorized, not only does this company create a resource for superb quality options including feminized seeds, it also provides extensive growing information for those looking for some support along their journey.

2 – Direct Planting

In nature, a marijuana seed will germinate in the soil and emerge with its taproot growing into the earth. Therefore, you can plant cannabis seeds straight into your growing medium of choice. The main benefit here is that you don’t have to worry about ‘shocking’ the seedling while transporting it.

Your seedling should instantly adjust to the new environment and grow. When using this method, dig a hole 0.5” – 1” deep in soil that is moist but not saturated. Keep things warm with a heating pad or lighting.

3 – Starter Cubes and Seedling Plugs

This has been championed as the easiest germination method. It is effectively a foolproof method. All you have to do is place the seed into the cube/plug and add water. Assuming you put the seeds in a room with the right temperature, germination should occur automatically within a few days. There is a pre-made hole for the seeds, so it is a ‘set it and forget it’ method.

The main downside with this germination method is that such plugs are generally available in packs of 50. Waste is inevitable if you only plan on planting a few cannabis seeds. The plugs dry out in a week or so and become unusable.

You can also use Rockwool cubes as they are cheap and easy to find. However, they are a terrible burden on the environment and bad for your health. Rockwool also has a high pH (which means you must rinse the cubes first) and offers a low cloning and germination success rate.

4 – Overnight Soaking

This is as simple as option #3. It involves nothing more than placing the seeds in a glass of lukewarm water overnight. It is a good idea if you’re using old and hard seeds. The soaking process can breathe new life into them. When you place the seeds in water, they float for a few hours before sinking to the bottom.

The soaking process can breathe new life into old seeds.

If you use a transparent container such as glass, you get to see the white taproot break out! You shouldn’t leave seeds soaking in water for more than 32 hours. Otherwise, seeds that haven’t sprouted yet will drown. If the seeds haven’t germinated by the 32-hour mark, put them in a warm and moist place to complete the process. You should probably use the paper towel method at this point.

5 – A Germination Station

You can purchase a readymade version online. Alternatively, attempt a DIY station by placing a plastic dome over a plate that you then add to a heating pad. Professionally made stations are relatively inexpensive and work rather well. You can buy one for under $40, and their plastic tops ensure better humidity control. With top brands, all you have to do is choose your growing media and plugs to start growing.

Transplanting Germinated Cannabis Seeds

There is no room for a delay once your cannabis seeds have begun to sprout. Now is the time to transfer the seed to its growing medium. Most growers prefer to use small pots, to begin with. Make sure you fill enough pots with loose potting soil and use a pencil to poke a hole around 0.25” deep. Remember, you could break the taproot very easily. Transfer it using tweezers and drop the seed into the hole with the root facing down. Finally, cover it with a thin layer of soil.

For the first few days, use a spray bottle to water the seeds, because adding too much water can drown them. It is worth investing in a pH meter to test the soil regularly and make sure it has enough moisture. If all goes well, the seed should sprout from the earth within a week. If it hasn’t sprouted within ten days, it will probably die.

Turn on your grow light once you have planted the seeds. The heat improves germination rates and speeds up the process of the seedlings opening their first set of leaves. These leaves will remain yellow until exposed to a sufficient level of light in any case. When you plant multiple seeds, you will find that they grow at different rates.

Inevitably, some will fail, while others will flourish. You will have seeds that pop fast and proliferate. Don’t be disappointed if you have a few failures because that’s part and parcel of the growing process. Even when you get everything right, you will inevitably lose a few seeds, and it won’t be your fault!

EDITOR’S CHOICE – Homegrown CannabisCo

Homegrown CannabisCo are the masters when it comes to seeds. Offering a massive variety of cannabis seeds that are well categorized, not only does this company create a resource for superb quality options including feminized seeds, it also provides extensive growing information for those looking for some support along their journey.

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