Posted on

Americano seeds

Americano seeds

What is a D-pak? You said, “Give me more than a packet but less than a pound”. We said “d-pak”. d=DIVERSITY

Great women and men make Native American Seed the go-to team for native seeds. With gratitude, we ask your help. Help Connect us with passionate others. Help good People in pursuit of purposeful careers, those with rich skills and interests, to find us. Native American Seed has offerings for diverse people searching to exercise horticultural, agri-mechanical, or various computer skills to make a better future. Email resume to [email protected]

>> Nurseries, Garden Centers, Gift Stores: Is your retail location a resource for Water Conservation, Responsible Beauty, Wildlife Habitat? Please give us a call 325-446-3600 for 2022 wholesale pricing on lawn and garden packages. Approved Retail Partners are listed on our Buy Local page.

With over 48 million acres of lawn in the US, it is high time we reduce or replace thirsty, pesticide ridden, energy consuming landscapes with crucial wildlife habitat. Meadow and prairie plantings are the most logically natural appproach. By planting for wildlife, we are planting for human life. Bring nature home. Become native to your place.

Looking for diverse seed mixes?

Long before beginning Native American Seed in 1988, we had already dedicated our work to restoring integrity in relationships between people, wildlife, land, water and plants. The work has always been about connections of all kinds. among all the relative beings. The integrity of our seeds comes from the natives only that we grow. We are thankful for your interest in our work.

Now is the time to plant many of the wildflowers that are part of the “rainforest” in our area of the planet – the plains and prairies. From smaller pocket prairies to larger restorations, these native seed mixes are ready to find new homes where they can begin to re-establish their balance in nature.

At Native American Seed we deeply appreciate big hearted folks like Sara Dykman who are spreading light. Her new book Bicycling with Butterflies is available April 2021. Even if you can’t bike the migration, you can be a part of it by providing native plants and milkweed for the monarchs and other pollinators. We are in this together. We each make a difference.

And from our close neighbor, don’t miss what Turk Pipkin is workin on: Nobelity Project / Monarch Mission Milkweed.

With so much negative energies swirling about us, many people are saying:

“I just want to do something positive today”
�I would like to plant good seeds in the meadow.�
�I have hopes of a more beautiful tomorrow.�
�I want to feel like I belong, touch the earth, and restore the land.�

Back here at the farm, we�re working �til dusk again. Planting more rows than we had last year. We must carry on. We plant for next year�s crop. because we are farmers. We have faith in life.

Texas is home to more than 3,700-streams & 15 major Rivers. Totaling 191,000-miles, riparian areas are essential in storing and protecting water quality, preventing erosion, and providing nutrients and habitat for fish, fireflies and wildlife. Our actions (or lack of) can sustain healthy, vibrant natural riparian areas for all to enjoy now and in the future.

Often, the best thing you can do for stream banks is leave them alone. Heavy equipment compacts soil, making recovery difficult. Cleared, manicured turf lawns are extremely low stabilizer plant communities offering little soil protection or water filtration. After flooding, leave downed trees and drift in place where practical. Native, deep-rooted, diverse plant communities work together with big dead wood, limbs and debris to help dissipate floodwater energy, filter and trap sediment, and stabilize soil and plant recovery. Regeneration can occur naturally in riparian areas especially where there are existing healthy uplands in place.

Touch the earth and quietly listen. 150 years ago only native plants grew here. Though many changes have occurred, they would love to come back home. We encourage you to become native to your place

NEW Conservancy Wildflowers:
Smooth White Penstemon – tubular white-pink large flowers that bloom in pairs and attrace native bees, especially the Long Tongue Bees & Bumble Bees. Hummingbirds and butterflies also benefit from its sweet nectar.
White Rosinweed – Blooms in the hottest time of year when few other resources are available.
Blue Wild Indigo – Beautiful deep indigo blue pea like blooms.
Bicycling with Butterflies – 10K+ mile jouney following monarch migration. Sara Dykman did it solo, on a bike cobbled together from used parts.

Shade-Friendly Widlflowers:
Shade-Friendly Wildflower Mix – make effective use of dappled sunlight in and around woods and other areas of shade
Blue Curls – eye catching color, unique bloom pattern
Pigeonberry – hardy, low-growing native
Cowpen Daisy – dependable bloomer and essential butterfly nectar source
Frostweed – during freezing temps, see unique ice formations formed as sap leaks from split stems

“Why Native Plants”is an excerpt from Urban & Suburban Meadows published by Catherine Zimmerman. To learn more, visit The Meadow Project.

If we choose to re-connect to our outdoor living spaces with the diversity of native plants, many benefits will return to the land. Benefits to many species, but to the humans too.

Wondering what to plant? Many of the natives can be seeded now. Erosion Control Blankets – are helpful at holding moisture & valuable topsoil.

Have a question?

Need help? Please click image above to start a live chat
or call us toll free 800.728.4043
to speak with our friendly customer care staff.

Basketflower Seeds

Sowing: Direct sow in late fall or early spring, planting basket flower seeds thinly and 1/2″ deep. In the spring, keep the soil moist after sowing; germination should occur within 7-10 days. To start indoors, plant three or four Centaurea Americana seeds 1/2″ below the surface in individual peat pots. Keep the soil lightly moist and at a temperature of 65-70 degrees F until germination; thin to the strongest seedlings. Transplant the seedlings before they reach a height of 5″.

Growing: Water seedlings occasionally until they become established. Mature plants prefer dry soil and handle drought well. Prune off developing tips to force the plant to produce more branches and fuller growth, as well as more flowers. This plant attracts butterflies and bees, in addition to providing nutritious seed for birds.

Harvesting: Basketflowers make excellent cut flowers, and have a sweet honey-like fragrance. They usually have a vase life of 4-5 days. When dried, the flowers retain their color and make a good addition to dried flower arrangements or potpourri. To dry the flowers, choose blossoms that have just begun blooming; pick them as soon as the dew has dried. Bundle the stems and hang them upside down in a well-ventilated, dark place for about 2 weeks.

Seed Saving: After the flower fades, the tiny oblong seeds will form. As soon as the seed can easily be removed, it is mature. Remove the dried seed heads and rub them lightly to separate the seed from the husk. Store basket flower seeds in a cool, dry place.

FAST FACTS

Common Names: American Star Thistle, American Napweed, Thornless Thistle, Sweet Sultan, Shaving Brush, American Basket-Flower, Powderpuff Thistle, Cardo del Valle

Latin Name: Centaurea americana

Species Origin: US Native Wildflower

Type: Native Wildflowers

Life Cycle: Annual

USDA Zones: 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12

US Regions: California, Mountain, Arid/Desert, Plains/Texas, Midwest, Northern, Northeast, Southeast

Seeds per Ounce: 29,900

Stratification: No Stratification

Germination Ease: No Stratification

Sunlight: Full Sun, Part Sun

Height: 48 Inches

Color: Pink

Bloom Season: Blooms Late Spring, Blooms Early Summer

Uses: Cut Flowers, Dried Flowers, Deer Resistant

DESCRIPTION

IN-STOCK ORDERS SHIP THE NEXT BUSINESS DAY VIA THE US POST OFFICE.

The basket-like base of these blossoms holds delicate petals, hence its name. Although it is a distant relative of the thistle, the colorful flowers give off a sweet honey-like scent.

This American relative of bachelor’s button or cornflower grows wild in the south-central region of the United States as well as in Mexico. Its common name is derived from the basket-like base of each blossom that holds the delicate petals. The genus name “Centaurea” comes from Greek mythology, as according to legend, one of the centaurs used this flower for healing purposes after battle.

HOW TO GROW

Sowing: Direct sow in late fall or early spring, planting basket flower seeds thinly and 1/2″ deep. In the spring, keep the soil moist after sowing; germination should occur within 7-10 days. To start indoors, plant three or four Centaurea Americana seeds 1/2″ below the surface in individual peat pots. Keep the soil lightly moist and at a temperature of 65-70 degrees F until germination; thin to the strongest seedlings. Transplant the seedlings before they reach a height of 5″.

Growing: Water seedlings occasionally until they become established. Mature plants prefer dry soil and handle drought well. Prune off developing tips to force the plant to produce more branches and fuller growth, as well as more flowers. This plant attracts butterflies and bees, in addition to providing nutritious seed for birds.

Harvesting: Basketflowers make excellent cut flowers, and have a sweet honey-like fragrance. They usually have a vase life of 4-5 days. When dried, the flowers retain their color and make a good addition to dried flower arrangements or potpourri. To dry the flowers, choose blossoms that have just begun blooming; pick them as soon as the dew has dried. Bundle the stems and hang them upside down in a well-ventilated, dark place for about 2 weeks.

Seed Saving: After the flower fades, the tiny oblong seeds will form. As soon as the seed can easily be removed, it is mature. Remove the dried seed heads and rub them lightly to separate the seed from the husk. Store basket flower seeds in a cool, dry place.

FAST FACTS

Common Names: American Star Thistle, American Napweed, Thornless Thistle, Sweet Sultan, Shaving Brush, American Basket-Flower, Powderpuff Thistle, Cardo del Valle

Latin Name: Centaurea americana

Species Origin: US Native Wildflower

Type: Native Wildflowers

Life Cycle: Annual

USDA Zones: 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12

US Regions: California, Mountain, Arid/Desert, Plains/Texas, Midwest, Northern, Northeast, Southeast